College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Randy M Harp (Dean)
Location: Ag Building, Room 135, 903.886.5358
College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/ag

The College of Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resources offers degrees at both the baccalaureate and master’s levels. A Bachelor of Science degree can be earned in several different majors, as described below.  

Majors in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in any of the following majors must complete:

  1. general requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Pre-Professional Program for Veterinary Medicine

The College of Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resources also offers an undergraduate pre-professional program in pre-veterinary medicine. Students are advised to follow the pre-professional curriculum as well as pursue a degree in Animal Science. Students selecting the pre-veterinary program will be trained in biological, animal, chemical and physical sciences. For additional information, contact Dr. Douglas Eborn (douglas.eborn@tamuc.edu), Dr. Megan Owen (megan.owen@tamuc.edu), or Dr. Amanda Delisle (amanda.delisle@tamuc.edu).

Teacher Education Programs

Students interested in becoming a middle or high school teacher of Agricultural Science and Technology or Family and Consumer Sciences should contact Dr. Keith Frost (keith.frost@tamuc.edu), Dr. Bob Williams (bob.williams@tamuc.edu), or Dr. Doug LaVergne (doug.lavergne@tamuc.edu) for additional information.

Minors in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

AEC 2317 - Agricultural Economics
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2317) A study of economic principles, with emphasis on their application to the solution of farm, agribusiness, and agricultural industry problems.

AEC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AEC 301 - Trends in the Food Industry
Hours: 1-3
Analysis of current trends in the food industry, including norms, specifications, and standards; trade issues; and policies with national and international scope that affect the U.S. food industry. The focus is on developing an understanding of the causes and consequences of such trends, the various issues involved, and how they affect stakeholders and society. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

AEC 302 - Computer Applications in Agriculture
Hours: 3
An introductory course to computer applications with specific emphasis on applications used in agricultural businesses. Content includes spreadsheet management, word processing, and presentation applications.

AEC 314 - Farm Management
Hours: 3
Farm Management. Three semester hours. Techniques and procedures used for decision making in the farm business. Determination of optimum enterprise choice, resource combination and techniques of financial management, budgeting, and whole farm/ranch planning.

AEC 316 - Agricultural Marketing
Hours: 3
Agricultural Marketing. Three semester hours. A broad view of marketing; food markets and consumption; marketing functions and institutions. Applications of economic theory to agricultural price estimation, discovery, and determination.

AEC 324 - Farm Management Lab
Hours: 1
Students will be exposed to hands-on farm management problem-solving techniques using technology.

AEC 340 - Agricultural Finance
Hours: 3
Agricultural Finance. Three semester hours. Analysis of capital investments, interpretation of financial statements, capital structure considerations for agricultural firms, farm real estate pricing, and financial intermediation in agriculture.

AEC 347 - Agricultural Price Theory
Hours: 3
Intermediate microeconomic principles with agricultural commodity applications related to market price determination, resource allocations, and government policies.

AEC 350 - Agricultural Finance Laboratory
Hours: 1
Students will be exposed to hands-on agricultural finance problem-solving techniques using technology.

AEC 360 - Agricultural Law
Hours: 3
Agricultural Law. Three semester hours. Survey of law and legal decisions that impact agriculture including farm and preservation, water rights, pollution abatement standards, workers' rights, externalities, pesticide/insecticide regulation, product inspection, development of legislation, mineral rights and employer liability. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AEC 380 - Agricultural Statistics
Hours: 3
Principles and estimation techniques used in the analysis of agricultural data including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation coefficient, and regression. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or MATH 1324.

AEC 390 - Agricultural Statistics Laboratory
Hours: 1
Students will be exposed to hands-on agricultural statistics problem-solving techniques using technology.

AEC 435 - GLB/Agricultural Policy I
Hours: 3
Analytical treatment of historical, recent and current economic problems, and governmental policies influencing American agriculture and rural America. The focus is on developing an historical and conceptual understanding of the economics of agriculture and how public policy has and does influence the nature and performance of American agriculture.

AEC 445 - Natural Resource and Environmental Economics
Hours: 3
This course explores the approach that economists take to environmental and resource problems. It examines both the economic roots of environmental problems and the solutions that economists suggest. The course focuses on questions a policymaker must face in deciding how and when to regulate, including issues of efficiency and distribution.

AEC 455 - Commodity Futures and Options
Hours: 3
The objectives of this course are to understand why futures exchanges and commodity futures contracts exist; understand and be able to forecast basis; understand hedging and be able to design hedging strategies for various commodity producers and users; understand both put and call options and their potential use in a commodity risk management program; and understand the usefulness and shortcomings of fundamental and technical analysis.

AEC 489 - Indst Ag Economics
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AEC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 1131 - Intro To Agriculture
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1131) Introduction to agriculture and its relationship to the sciences. Also explores careers and opportunities in agriculture. Insights into the agriculture curriculum and course content are also presented. Required of all agriculture majors.

AG 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 300 - Professional Agricultural Communications
Hours: 1
Professional Agricultural Communications. One semester hour. Techniques of agricultural communication emphasizing principles involved in job search. Techniques of interviewing, resume writing, letters of inquiry, etc. For agriculture majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1301 and junior standing.

AG 314 - Comparative Vertebrate Physiology
Hours: 3
The course is a comparative study of basic physiological principles and functional organization with emphasis on the functioning of organ systems in various vertebrate classes and their adaptation to the environment leading to an understanding of evolutionary relationships. The course evaluates i) the mechanisms by which animals perform their life-sustaining functions, ii) the ways in which diverse phylogenetic groups of animals both resemble each other and differ, iii) the ways in which physiology and ecology interact, and iv) the importance of all levels of organization, from genes to proteins and tissues to organs, for the full understanding of physiological systems. Crosslisted with: BSC 314.

AG 315 - Ecological Genetics
Hours: 3
Ecological genetics is about how environmental and population-level processes affect the genetic structure of populations. The course begins with a basic overview Mendelian genetics followed by an in-depth study of population genetics and the intrinsic and extrinsic processes that influence the genetic composition of populations and metapopulations. Because the interaction between genes and the environment fundamentally affect the viability of populations, ecological genetics has broad relevance for understanding population stability and maintenance healthy populations. Crosslisted with: BSC 315.

AG 316 - Becoming a Wildlife Professional
Hours: 3
Working with wildlife can be a thrilling adventure steeped in the wonders of the natural world, but entering the field demands a strong personal commitment. Students will gain knowledge in the proper training and guidance needed to transform themselves into competitive applicants for wildlife jobs and forge successful careers. Student will learn about many entry-level jobs available for the next generation of wildlife biologists and conservationists. Over 100 diverse career options for aspiring wildlife workers will be presented, including work in biological field research, forestry, rehabilitation, ranching, photography, and refuge management. Students will learn the best ways to prepare for a vocation in the wildlife profession while obtaining pragmatic advice about applying for and obt Crosslisted with: BSC 316.

AG 335 - Wildlife Management I
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management I. Three semester hours. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the many aspects of wildlife and conservation science. It will provide an introduction to the history of wildlife management and conservation, ecosystems and ecology, population modeling, animal behavior, food and cover, wildlife diseases, predators and predation, and hunting and trapping. Offered: FALL

AG 336 - Wildlife Management II
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management II. Three semester hours. This course is designed to complement Wildlife Management I and provides an introduction to the many aspects of wildlife ecology and conservation science. Topics covered include water and soils, farmlands, rangelands, and forests, parks and refuges, urban wildlife management, and non-game and endangered species. Students are required to participate in field trips designed to give practical experience in wildlife management techniques.

AG 337 - Field Methods in Wildlife and Conservation Science
Hours: 4
This course provides students with practical training in the methods used to collect quantitative data on plant and animal populations, animal movements and home ranges, habitat associations, and animal behavior. Field exercises are integrated with lecture material emphasizing study design, statistics, and data interpretation. Crosslisted with: BSC 337.

AG 338 - Wildlife Management Techniques
Hours: 3
This class will develop the principles and techniques for managing wildlife populations. Topics covered will include experimental design, hypothesis testing, scientific writing, techniques for capturing and marking wildlife, age and sex determination, parameter estimation (population size, density, survival, etc.), radio-telemetry, home range and resource selection. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to participate in a field-based classroom research project when and where feasible. Crosslisted with: BSC 338.

AG 339 - Becoming a Wildlife Professional
Hours: 3
Working with wildlife can be a thrilling adventure steeped in the wonders of the natural world, but entering the field demands a strong personal commitment. Students will gain knowledge in the proper training and guidance needed to transform themselves into competitive applicants for wildlife jobs and forge successful careers. Student will learn about many entry-level jobs available for the next generation of wildlife biologists and conservationists. Over 100 diverse career options for aspiring wildlife workers will be presented, including work in biological field research, forestry, rehabilitation, ranching, photography, and refuge management. Crosslisted with: BSC 339.

AG 350 - Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture
Hours: 3
This course introduces students to the common principles and practices associated with sustainable agriculture from ecological, economical, social, and ethical perspectives.

AG 352 - Urban Agriculture
Hours: 3
This course provides an extensive overview of agriculture and food security issues and practices at the local level in cities in the U.S. and abroad.

AG 392 - GLB/Appld Ethics US World Ag
Hours: 3
This course examines major, contemporary issues in agriculture and food policy with emphasis on the ethical aspects of each issue. Discussion focuses on assessing the particular economic, cultural, geographic, political, religious, technological and scientific principles with a moral and ethical framework. Course scope is approximately half U.S. domestic issues and half international issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AG 397 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 400 - Seminar
Hours: 1
Seminar. One semester hour. Techniques involved in presenting scientific and technical oral reports. Oral presentations required. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

AG 402 - Ornithology
Hours: 3
This course begins with an overview of current theories regarding the origins of birds and flight. This is followed by a brief survey the living orders and their biogeography. Other topics include the mechanics and adaptations for flight, avian physiology and anatomy, migration, communication and behavior, ecology, and avian conservation. Prerequisites: BSC 301 with a minimum grade of C. Crosslisted with: BSC 402.

AG 404 - Vertebrate Biology
Hours: 3
This course takes a systematic approach to understanding vertebrate evolution, diversity and biology. It will follow the development of each vertebrate taxon through the fossil record from late Cambrian to the present. This is followed by discussions of vertebrate zoogeography, habitat and foraging, feeding modes, dispersal and migration, mating systems and parental care. Prerequisites: BSC 301 with a minimum grade of C. Crosslisted with: BSC 404.

AG 405 - Internship Agri-Industries
Hours: 3-6
Three to six semester hours. This course provides the opportunity for students to gain on-the-job experience in the preparation for careers in the rapidly growing agri-related areas of industry and business. Assignments will be at an approved work situation under supervision of a designated faculty member. Ten to twenty hours per week will be required.

AG 406 - Mammalogy
Hours: 3
The objective of this course is to survey the phylogenetic relationships, diversity, biology, and ecology of mammals, including an understanding of the characterization of the orders and families of the extant mammals based on morphological traits, evolutionary Crosslisted with: BSC 406.

AG 408 - Nutritional Biochemistry
Hours: 3
Nutritional Biochemistry - Three semester hours A course in biochemistry using nutrition as a model. Topics will include the energetics of metabolism, the structure and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and the integration of metabolic systems. Included also will be the chemistry of nitrogenous bases and how transcription and translation is accomplished on the cellular level. The course is 3-credit-hour class with 3 hours lecture and no lab (3,0). Prerequisites are ANS 407, CHEM 212, CHEM 314.

AG 415 - Upland Bird Ecology and Management
Hours: 3
Status, ecology, management, and conservation issues of North American upland game birds. Student will understand the role of upland game bird professionals. Develop knowledge of the status of North American upland game birds. Understand the basic principles of upland game bird ecology and management. Learn to apply knowledge to solve conservation problems. Crosslisted with: BSC 415.

AG 416 - Wildlife Population Biology
Hours: 3
This course outlines processes governing the abundance and distribution of animals and plants, and the consequences for natural resource management. Practical applications lie in wildlife management, sustainable harvesting of resources, pest control and conservation of endangered species. Topics will include mathematical models of population growth, population viability analysis, and metapopulations, dispersal, population harvesting, predation, population cycles, and competition. Prerequisites: Math 142 or MATH 2312. Crosslisted with: BSC 416.

AG 417 - Geospatial Mapping
Hours: 3
The course will provide basic knowledge of the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), including GIS theory and applications. The course will take a hands-on and problem solving approach to learning GIS and will cover basic GIS including map characteristics and projections, spatial data models, relational databases, and spatial analysis with a focus on natural resource research and management and environmental science. Crosslisted with: BSC 417.

AG 435 - Wildlife Habitat Ecology and M
Hours: 3
This class will expose the student to the history and concepts of an animal’s habitat beginning with the ideas of Aldo Leopold to current ideas of what habitat is. Students will be introduced to principles and techniques of habitat management as they apply to forest, rangeland, wetland, and agricultural ecosystems. Current concepts of Conservation Biology such as fragmentation, meta-population ecology, and corridor ecology will also be covered. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to attend field trips when and where feasible to see actual management practices conducted in the field. Crosslisted with: BSC 435.

AG 436 - Plant Diversity & Conservation
Hours: 3
The course focuses on patterns and distribution of plant diversity and threats to plant diversity. Range of strategies and approaches used in plant conservation will be discussed. Crosslisted with: BSC 436.

AG 438 - Wetland Ecology and Management
Hours: 4
This class will address the ecology of wetlands from a systems approach, starting first with what defines a wetland both legally and functionally, and covering important and defining principles of hydro-period, soils, wetland plants, wetland succession, delineation, and wetlands as wildlife habitat. The lab will immerse students in field exercises ranging from wetland plant collection and identification, and wetland bird identification. Students enrolled in this course must be willing to attend field trips when and where feasible to see different wetland types and the function and values they provide. Prerequisites: BSC 307. Crosslisted with: BSC 438.

AG 440 - Human Dimensions of Wildlife
Hours: 3
Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management explains how a wildlife professional can more effectively manage species and social-ecological systems by fully considering the role that humans play in every stage of the wildlife management process. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management provides the essential information that students and practitioners need to be effective problem solvers to handle a variety of situations, such as managing deer populations in residential areas, encounters between predators and people, or managing citizen input on wildlife issues. Topics will include human dimensions of wildlife management and conservation, wildlife use (hunting and fishing), working with public and private landowners, involving citizen scientists, managing citizen input, using economics to inform Crosslisted with: BSC 440.

AG 462 - Agroecology
Hours: 3
AG 462 Agroecology is a three hour course to understand agroecological concepts that incorporate ideas about a more environmentally and socially sensitive approach to agriculture, one that focuses not only in production, but also in ecological sustainability of a production system. Crosslisted with: BSC 462.

AG 463 - Landscape Ecology
Hours: 3
AG 463 landscape Ecology is a three hour course designed to provide an overview of the relationships between ecological processes in the environment and particular ecosystems using a variety of landscape scales, development of spatial patterns, and organizational levels of research and policy. Crosslisted with: BSC 463.

AG 464 - Principles of Sustainability
Hours: 3
AG 464 Principles of Sustainability is a three hour course designed to provide an overview of the social and biological principles of sustainability. An emphasis will also be placed on understanding on the education, health, population dynamics, culture, agriculture, food security, and natural resources aspects of sustainability. Crosslisted with: BSC 464.

AG 489 - Indst Agricul Sci
Hours: 3
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AG 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 0-6
AG 490 - H Honors Thesis Hours: 6 Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite Consent of head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

AG 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
AG 491 - H IND HONORS RDGS Hours: 3 Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite Consent of head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

AG 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-5
Special Topics. One to five semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AGED 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AGED 371 - Agricultural & Youth Leadershi
Hours: 3
Agricultural and Youth Leadership. Three semester hours. Application of leadership principles with emphasis on interpersonal and personal skills, organizational structure, and FFA and 4-H Club activities.

AGED 404 - Supervised Experience Programs
Hours: 3
Supervised Experience Programs - Three semester hours Theories and practices associated with experiential learning models used in secondary agricultural science programs and community-based youth programs.

AGED 465 - Student Tch Secondary Sch
Hours: 6
Student Teaching in the Secondary School. Six semester hours. (2) The student will teach in a selected school for a continuous period of 14 weeks under the joint supervision of local school officials and personnel of the University. The student teacher will engage in and develop, as nearly as possible, all professional competencies deemed essential in teaching an Agricultural Science and Technology program. Senior standing required. Prerequisite: SED 300, PSY 300

AGED 470 - Methods of Teaching Agricultural Science and Technology
Hours: 3
Professional skills deemed appropriate to and essential in the teaching of all phases of a local program of Agricultural Science and Technology will be developed. This course is taken during the student teaching residency semester. Senior standing required. Prerequisites: AGED 371.

AGED 471 - The Program of Instruction in Agricultural Science and Technology
Hours: 3
A "Comprehensive Program of Instruction" will be planned for each student, including courses of study for the secondary school, programs of activities for th FFA, resource use and parent/community relations. Philosophy and administration of secondary and community-based Agricultural Science and Technology programs will be emphasized. This course is taken during the student teaching residency semester. Senior standing required. Prerequisites: SED 300.

AGED 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-6
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies.

AGED 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ALC 2301 - Introduction to Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communication
Hours: 3
This course is an introduction to principles of leadership, personal skill development, academic and scholarly development and application of leadership theory and leadership models. Emphasis in leadership styles, application of theory, social justice, conflict management, positive psychology, emotional intelligence, self-assessment, and reflection as applied to agriculture.

ALC 2302 - Personal Leadership Development in Agriculture
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the development of leadership in agricultural and related settings. The development, application, and reflection of personal leadership capabilities through self-assessments and experiential learning activities will be explored. Development of effective leadership identity through personal leadership inventories which include strengths, personality type, values, vision, communications skills, influence, commitment, goal achievement strategies, and emotional intelligence.

ALC 3301 - Organizational Leadership Development in Agriculture
Hours: 3
This course is designed for students who are interested in positions of leadership and who want to learn more about creating, organizing, and direction of effective groups and teams. Exploration of strategies and techniques for successful teams including conflict management, facilitation, negotiation, skill building, and experiential activities in agriculture. Topics of discussion include: components of a group and team, relationships of group and team members, effectiveness of groups and teams, and communication within groups and teams. Focus on major theories and impact of effective leadership in organizations in both theory and practice will also be explored. Students will develop skills in decision-making, management, and ethical leadership related to agricultural organizations.

ALC 3311 - Contemporary Issues in Agriculture Leadership, Education, and Communications
Hours: 3
This course is an evaluation of current issues pertaining to leadership in agriculture including a historical look at leadership and its impact on produces and consumers. Content and teaching will promote understanding of the agricultural industry with a focus on advocacy, written, online, and oral communications.

ALC 4301 - Professional Presentations in Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communications
Hours: 3
This course emphasizes techniques of interviewing resume writing, letters of inquiry, and presentation of scientific and technical oral reports. Effective listening strategies, communication strategies, interpersonal skills and presentation strategies essential for use in today's workplace will also be explored through the study and application of strategies and techniques for effective presentations in the food, agricultural, natural resources, as well as other professions, with emphasis on oral and visual presentation techniques. Presentation skills and strategies for formal and informal situations including conferences, poster presentations along with leadership, conflict resolution, interviewing, negotiation, and group communication theory and strategies will be discussed.

ALC 4311 - Public Relations, Crisis Communications, and Leading Change
Hours: 3
This course offers the development of theoretical knowledge of strategically managing communications and developing mutually beneficial relationships with the public, crisis issue management, crisis communication, image repair discourse, and implementing effective change leadership. Best practices (and other) practices are discussed through real-world case studies.

ALC 4312 - Senior Portfolio in Agricultural Leadership and Communications
Hours: 3
This course is designed to develop an ongoing reflection of individual accomplishments, skills, activities, programs, and other related experiences contributing to student personal development. The course will focus on: a personal statement of leadership/personal mission statement, resume, compilation of leadership experiences, and compilation of reflective essays on leadership experience including reflection on student leadership style, key qualities and strengths you possess, essay on leadership growth, goals, professional experience, certificates, honors, and letters of reference.

ALC 4602 - Professional Internship in Agricultural Leadership and Communications
Hours: 6
This course provides the opportunity for students to gain on-the-job experience to prepare them for careers in agricultural leadership, education, and communications. This course will require 20 hours per week equal to six hours of credit per semester. Students will develop goals, submit weekly progress reports, supervisor evaluations, and develop a report post internship.Consultation with faculty advisor is required prior to course registration is required to ensure the internship will provide the student with experience applicable to the agricultural leadership, education, and/or communications discipline. Prerequisites: Instructor Approval.

AMC 2303 - Agricultural Welding Techniques
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2303) Introduction to oxy-fuel cutting/welding, shielded metal arc welding, and gas metal arc welding processes in context of applications in agricultural equipment repair and fabrication.

AMC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

AMC 315 - Agri Systms Technology Mgmt
Hours: 3
Agricultural Systems Technology Management. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Preliminary study to acquaint student professionals with the principles and theories needed to comprehend and manage agricultural and environmental technology; introduce the application of information technology to agricultural and environment systems; develop mathematical concepts and unit analysis skills associated with machinery and equipment, industry and marketing, energy, structural and environmental and natural resource systems. Focus shall be on basic knowledge rather than on in-depth analysis of the systems covered. Prerequisites: Math 141 or consent of the instructor.

AMC 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics - 1-4 Semester Hours

AMC 423 - Natural Resources Management
Hours: 3
An investigation of best management practices and conservation techniques used by land owners and managers to protect renewable natural resources from intensive agricultural production methods. Emphasis will be on preventing soil loss and contamination, maintaining water quality, and protecting wildlife habitat. Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor approval.

AMC 424 - Agricultural Safety
Hours: 3
Principles and strategies for implementing safety training and reducing risk of injuries in agricultural enterprises including shop and machinery operations, chemical applications, livestock handling, transportation, and farm-based recreation. Prerequisites: Junior or instructor approval.

AMC 425 - Housing and Home Improvement
Hours: 3
This course addresses contemporary issues relevant to residential family housing and home improvement.

AMC 426 - Agri Power & Energy Management
Hours: 3
A study of the principles and theories needed to comprehend and manage agricultural and environmental technology associated with machinery/equipment and energy systems. Reduction and synthesis of natural and applied science principles which involve mechanical, electrical, chemical power systems; the adjustments, fabrication, maintenance, repair and man agreement of machines and equipment utilized in said systems; knowledge of entrepreneurship, client relations, communications, economics, safety, service, planning, and regulation of technologies associated with agriculture and the environment. Prerequisites: AMC 315 and junior standing.

AMC 428 - Laboratory Management in Agricultural Mechanization
Hours: 3
Principles and techniques for planning, organizing, and supervising instructional activities in agricultural mechanization. Topics include lab safety, inventory control, equipment selection, skill development, and assessment methods.

AMC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AMC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 1119 - Introduction to Animal Science Laboratory
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1119) Laboratory in the preliminary study of the selection, reproduction, nutrition and marketing of beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep, horses and poultry.

ANS 1319 - Introduction to Animal Science
Hours: 3

ANS 2319 - Livestock Handling and Presentation
Hours: 3
Students will be engaged in active experiential learning in all aspects of handling, training, fitting and presenting livestock in meat animal production systems. Included in the content will be selection, feeding, clipping, and stock show preparation.

ANS 2321 - Livestock Selection & Evaluation
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2321) Selection and evaluation of breeding and market animals, breed characteristics, and carcass evaluation as it relates to live animal evaluation. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or concurrent enrollment.

ANS 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 300 - Pre-Junior Livestock Judging Team
Hours: 2
Beginning livestock judging training, including evaluation, selection, and oral reasons, for students that will compete on the Texas A&M University-Commerce Livestock Judging Team the following Spring. Class will also meet outside of the scheduled time. Prerequisites: ANS 205 or 2321 (Livestock Evaluation and Selection) with a minimum grade of C.

ANS 301 - Junior Livestock Judging Team
Hours: 2
Competitive Livestock Judging Team representing Texas A&M University-Commerce at intercollegiate livestock judging contests in the Spring Semester. Students will receive extensive training in livestock evaluation, selection, and oral reasons. Team practices, travel, and contests will also occur outside of regularly scheduled class periods. Prerequisites: ANS 300 (Pre-Junior Livestock Judging Team), with a minimum grade of C.

ANS 307 - Animal Feeds and Feeding
Hours: 3
Chemical composition of feedstuffs, requirements of domestic animals, utilization of nutrients, formulating and balancing rations. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and MATH 1314.

ANS 308 - Animal Nutrition
Hours: 3
Functions of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, lipids, minerals and water. Chemistry and physiology of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients and their metabolites in animals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, CHEM 1405 or 1411, and MATH 1314.

ANS 309 - Animal Breeding
Hours: 3
Genetic evaluation and estimation of breeding values. Selection and the use mating systems including the use of inbreeding, crossbreeding, and other mating plans. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 and ANS 1319.

ANS 310 - Animal Genetics
Hours: 3
An introduction to molecular genetics including Mendelian and population genetics, replication, transcription, and translation. Gene expression and regulation. Use of current genomic methodologies including genotyping and transgenics in animal agriculture. Prerequisites: (ANS 1319 or BSC 1407 or PLS 1315 or PLS 1307) and CHEM 1411.

ANS 311 - Reproductive Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Comparative anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems of domestic animals, endocrinology of reproduction, gestation and parturition. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, BSC 1407, CHEM 1411.

ANS 312 - Artificial Breeding of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Principles of artificial breeding of farm animals. Semen collection and evaluation, gamete freezing and storage, reproduction management techniques and pregnancy diagnosis. Prerequisites: ANS 311.

ANS 313 - Dairy Cattle Management
Hours: 3
Dairy breeds and their selection, milk secretion, composition and handling, milking equipment and facilities. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 314 - Comparative Vertebrate Physiology
Hours: 3
The course is a comparative study of basic physiological principles and functional organization with emphasis on the functioning of organ systems in various vertebrate classes and their adaptation to the environment leading to an understanding of evolutionary relationships. The course evaluates i) the mechanisms by which animals perform their life-sustaining functions, ii) the ways in which diverse phylogenetic groups of animals both resemble each other and differ, iii) the ways in which physiology and ecology interact, and iv) the importance of all levels of organization, from genes to proteins and tissues to organs, for the full understanding of physiological systems. Cross listed with BSC 314

ANS 317 - Livestock Management Techniques
Hours: 3
Application of animal handling and management techniques for dairy, beef, sheep, swine and poultry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 319 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Structure and function of organ systems with special reference to domestic animals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 320 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals Laboratory
Hours: 1
Laboratory systematic study of the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. NOTE: Dissection of animal cadavers will be required of all students. Prerequisites: ANS 1319. Corequisites: VETN 319, ANS 319. Crosslisted with: VETN 320.

ANS 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 401 - Senior Livestock Judging Team
Hours: 2
Students will represent Texas A&M University-Commerce in intercollegiate livestock judging contests in the Fall Semester (finishing their collegiate livestock judging eligibility). Students will receive advanced training in livestock evaluation, selection, and oral reasons. Team practice, travel, and contests will also occur outside of scheduled class times. Prerequisites: ANS 301 (Junior Livestock Judging Team), with a minimum grade of B.

ANS 409 - Ultrasound Techniques
Hours: 3
Ultrasound Techniques for Body Composition in Livestock - Three semester hours Basic knowledge and techniques of real-time ultrasound to measure body composition in livestock. Cross list with: ANS 510 Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 411 - Sheep and Goat Management
Hours: 3
Types, breeds and usefulness of sheep and goats in the U.S. Management systems, production schemes, and general husbandry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 412 - Beef Cattle Management
Hours: 3
Concepts and principles of breeding, feeding and management of beef cattle in the U.S. A survey of the past, present and future ideas of the beef cattle industry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 413 - Swine Management
Hours: 3
Commercial and purebred swine operations. Feeding, breeding, and management practices, production efficiency and waste management facilities. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 415 - Companion Animal Management
Hours: 3
Anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health of companion animals including cats, dogs, rabbits, rats, mice, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Problem solving and enterprise management. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and junior standing.

ANS 419 - Diseases and Parasites of Livestock
Hours: 3
Diseases and Parasites of Livestock. Three semester hours. A study of the control and prevention of common infectious and non-infectious diseases of livestock. The common parasites, their prevention, and control. Prerequisites: AnS 118, BSC 1407, BSC 1413 and 254.

ANS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

ANS 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis - Three semester hours

ANS 491 - H Honor Reading
Hours: 3
Honors Readings in Animal Science. Three semester hours.

ANS 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

EQSC 2321 - Horse Evaluation
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2321) Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Introduction to horse judging. Establishes the critical and analytical thinking skills, judgment, and written and oral communication skills in preparation for horse judging in competitive settings.

EQSC 140 - Introduction to Horsemanship and Equitation
Hours: 3
Introduction to horse handling and equitation including grooming, saddling, bridling, horse care and basic riding techniques (English and Western). Emphasis on practical work and confidence building for students with little or no horse experience.

EQSC 220 - Intermediate Horsemanship and Equitation
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the refinement of the skills of western riders with some previous experience. The emphasis is on training or conditioning of older horses, and understanding equine behavior as it relates to riding and training horses. Prerequisites: EQSC 140 or instructor approval.

EQSC 240 - Introduction to Equine Science
Hours: 3
Introduction to structure and function of the horse, equine management, nutrition, conformation, biomechanics, reproduction and health. Overview of the equine industry and career choices.

EQSC 241 - Advanced Horsemanship
Hours: 3
Refinement of equitation and horse training principles for various disciplines. Prerequisites: EQSC 240, EQSC 345.

EQSC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

EQSC 321 - Equine Genetics and Mating Selection
Hours: 3
Principles of genetics, and application of breeding selection with emphasis on the horse. Study of genetic disorders, inheritance, and genetic improvement of horses. Prerequisites: ANS 118 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 322 - Equine Exercise Physiology
Hours: 3
Fundamentals of evidence-based equine training and exercise methods. Discussion of training programs, their assessment and effectiveness, and prevention of exercise-induced injuries. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240, and EQSC 323.

EQSC 323 - Equine Anatomy and Physiology
Hours: 3
Equine structure and function with emphasis on the nervous, respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems.

EQSC 325 - Advanced Horse Evaluation
Hours: 3
Course emphasis is on equine evaluation in competition with refinement of decision making and public speaking skills. Travel to horse competitions is required. Prerequisites: EQSC 225.

EQSC 335 - Stock Horse Equitation
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the training and showing of horse in collegiate stock horse competition. Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

EQSC 340 - Equine Marketing and Sale Fitting
Hours: 3
This class is designed to help students learn the objectives for training yearling colts. The students will do ground work with the horses that is beyond halter breaking the colts. The students will work on getting horses ready for the many aspects involved in being saddle horses. The students will learn how to teach the colts to walk, trot, and lope in both directions on a longe line, load into a trailer on their own, listen to verbal commands, come up to people in the pasture for catching, stand correctly and still for purposes of show, general obedience, and future farrier needs, as well as many other aspects of training a young horse.

EQSC 341 - 2-Yr-Old Horse Training
Hours: 3
Habituation of the young horse to tack and work under saddle. Prerequisites: EQSC 240, EQSC 241, EQSC 345.

EQSC 342 - Equine Nutrition
Hours: 3
Nutrition of the horse according to stage of development, use and training. Discussion of ration formulation, feeding practice and digestive disorders. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 343 - Equine Reproduction
Hours: 3
Anatomy and physiology of the mare and stallion including lactation, endocrinology, parturition, semen quality and behavior. Management of broodmares, stallions and foals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 345 - Equine Training
Hours: 3
Introduction to equine perception, behavior, memory and learning. Behavior analysis in young and adult horses and application of evidence-based training principles. Introduction of corrective methods to discourage unwanted behaviors and enforce the desired behaviors. Prerequisites: EQSC 220 or instructor approval.

EQSC 346 - Equine Reproductive Techniques
Hours: 3
Introduction to routine reproductive techniques such as estrus detection, semen management, breeding techniques, artificial insemination, sonographic pregnancy diagnosis, and introduction to reproductive health management. Emphasis is on stallion, mare and foal examination and application of veterinary techniques related to equine reproduction. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240, EQSC 343.

EQSC 350 - Equine Sales & Marketing
Hours: 3
This course involves discussions of the economic, structural, cultural, and political factors impacting marketing functions in equine business enterprises. Advertising and promotions for sale horses, determining prices for horses, breeding fees, how to analyze pedigrees and black type pedigrees, as well as the application of market research design and methodology in establishing equine sales related businesses. Students will also learn how to fit and prepare a young horses for sale. Prerequisites: EQSC 240 or ANS 1319.

EQSC 355 - Equine Industry Tour
Hours: 3
Tours of breeding, training, and competition facilities that are of importance to the equine industry. An additional course fee may be assessed to cover travel, and lodging arrangements. The student will be required to pay this course fee in advance of departure for the tour. Scholarship funds may not cover the additional expense of this course. Student will be responsible for own meals and extras. Prerequisites: EQSC 240.

EQSC 441 - Stable Management
Hours: 3
Horse and barn management principles for breeding, training or boarding facilities including horse and client safety, preventative health care, record keeping, emergency care, facility and manure management, feed and supply management, equine law and customer relations. Prerequisites: EQSC 240.

EQSC 443 - Equine Enterprise Management
Hours: 3
Application of economic principles to the equine industry in order to develop a profitable equine business. Discussion of strategies to develop a business idea or a starter business, as well as adequate pricing and marketing of equine services. Prerequisites: ANS 118 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

EQSC 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis. Three semester hours.

EQSC 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member.

EQSC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topic

FDSC 1329 - Principles of Food Science
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1329) Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Basic principles of food preservation in relation to processing techniques and quality control procedures. Processing effects on aesthetic and nutritional food quality of plant and animal products will be explored. Field trips to food processing companies will be required.

FDSC 318 - Meat Technology
Hours: 3
Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Theory and practice of slaughtering, processing, curing, and storing meat from domestic animals. Wholesale and retail cuts. Prerequisites: ANS 1119, ANS 1319.

FDSC 421 - Food Systems: Farm to Fork
Hours: 3
This course will introduce students to the concept of food systems at the local, regional, and global levels. Students will examine and reflect on critical issues influencing food production, processing, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisites: Junior standing.

FDSC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 0-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

FDSC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PLS 1107 - Introduction to Plant Science Lab
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1107) Course will provide students with hands-on exercises in the lab, greenhouse, and field. Students will grow agronomic and vegetable crops, separate plants into their morphological components, prepare and view cross sections of leaves and stems, alter light sources, test different soil fertility treatments, administer water stress and measure plant water relations, emasculate blooms, alter environmental conditions to promote flowering, quantify yield components, and examine genetic variability.

PLS 1115 - Introduction to Horticulture Laboratory
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1115) Introduction to the techniques and science for the growth and propagation of horticultural plants, including identification, propagation, fertilization, and pruning.

PLS 1307 - Introduction to Plant Science
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1307) An introduction to the principles of plant growth, general crop production, and ornamental and production horticulture.

PLS 1315 - Introduction to Horticulture
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1315) Introduction to the science and art of modern horticultural plant production and growth, including propagation, fertilization, pest control, and pruning; major groups of garden crops including vegetables, fruits and nuts, ornamentals, houseplants, and florist crops. crops; lab includes propagation and culture of garden plants in field and greenhouse.

PLS 2313 - Economic Entomology
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2313) Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). This course introduces students to the major orders of insects and other arthropods of economic importance with specific emphasis on those beneficial and harmful to agricultural and horticultural crops, livestock, pets, and food products. Control techniques using Integrated Pest Management will be included.

PLS 230 - Ornamental Plant Identification
Hours: 3
Ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, and garden annuals and perennials. Their identification, nomenclature, classification, cultural requirements and landscape uses.

PLS 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PLS 303 - Introduction to Floral Design
Hours: 3
Introduction to the history and uses of floral art in society. Principles and elements of design will be discussed and demonstrated using floral materials.

PLS 305 - Landscape Design
Hours: 3
Design of residential and commercial landscapes. The student will learn basic design concepts and themes, be able to create landscape plans, and will be able to provide a cost estimate for the design. Prerequisites: PLS 230 or instructor approval.

PLS 306 - Plant Propagation
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to sexual and asexual plant propagation. The student will learn the skills and techniques to successfully propagate plants from seeds and other vegetative structures. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or PLS 1307.

PLS 309 - Soil Science
Hours: 3
Origin, formation, fertility and management of soils. Prerequisites: PlS 115 or 1415, and Chem 1405 or 1411.

PLS 320 - Soil Fert-Plant Nutrition
Hours: 3
Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition. Three semester hours. Elements required for plant nutrition and their effects on plant growth. Principles of uptake, transport and assimilation. Prerequisite: PLS 309.

PLS 323 - Field Crops
Hours: 3
Field Crops. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Principles of agronomic crop production practices. Major field crops and management techniques will be studied. Prerequisite: PlS 115

PLS 326 - Forage and Pasture Crops
Hours: 3
The production, harvesting, storage, and uses of forage crops, hay and pasture crops, improvements, care and management of pastures given special emphasis. Practice work includes identification of seeds and plants, judging of hay, and field and pasture observation. Prerequisites: PLS 115, PLS 309.

PLS 329 - Soil Science Laboratory
Hours: 1
Atudents will explore laboratory techniques to determine soil physical and chemical properties that are related to plant growth. Prerequisites: PlS 115 or 1415, and Chem 1405 or 1411.

PLS 355 - Interior Plantscaping
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction into interior plantscapes. The course will include identification, selection, installation, maintenance, and management of plants used in interior landscapes.

PLS 381 - Crop Physiology
Hours: 3
Physiological processes underlying crop management practices and their alternatives. Prerequisites: Chem 1407, PlS 115 or PLS 1415.

PLS 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

PLS 420 - Crop Production Practicum
Hours: 3
Crop Production Practicum. Three semester hours (1 lecture, 4 lab). Study of crop production practices in this area by actually planting, growing, harvesting, and marketing a crop: (a) Wheat or Oats; (b) Corn; (c) Grain Sorghum; (d) Cotton. A report, including costs and returns, will be due upon completion of the project. Course may be repeated when subject varies, up to a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: PlS 115.

PLS 430 - Greenhouse Management
Hours: 3
This course covers greenhouse structures and equipment needed for successful plant production in a greenhouse. The student will learn about greenhouse construction, production, and management as a business venture. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or 1307.

PLS 434 - Weed Control
Hours: 3
An introduction to the principles of weeds, weed control, and herbicides.

PLS 450 - Landscape Management
Hours: 3
This course covers information related to the management of landscapes on residential and commercial properties. Topics will include items related to effective installation and maintenance of landscape properties, including financial and personnel aspects of managing a landscape business. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or instructor approval.

PLS 455 - Turfgrass Management
Hours: 3
Establishment and maintenance of turfgrasses in lawns, sports fields, and golf courses. Course will include selection, planting, fertilization, maintenance, and pest and disease control.

PLS 460 - Plant Taxonomy
Hours: 3
A systematic overview of the plant kingdom focusing on classification and identification of unknown specimens.

PLS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

PLS 490 - Independent Study
Hours: 3

PLS 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3

PLS 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

VETN 1111 - Veterinary Clinical Externship I
Hours: 2
This course consists of a supervised clinical experience in a work place. The primary objective is to reinforce and expand upon concepts learned by participating in actual cases and familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Nurse in a practical, applied atmosphere. The student is to achieve competency in skills and decision-making abilities commensurate with the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA) requirements. NOTE: 160 clinical hours (~ 4 weeks) during the summer will be completed over the duration of this course. Prerequisites: ANS 319, ANS 320, VETN 321, VETN 140, VETN 220, VETN 326, VETN 250, PSY 2301, MGT 1301.

VETN 2111 - Veterinary Clinical Externship II
Hours: 3
This course consists of a supervised clinical experience in a work place. The primary objective is to reinforce and expand upon concepts learned by participating in actual cases and familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Nurse in a practical, applied atmosphere. The student is to achieve competency in skills and decision-making abilities commensurate with the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA) requirements. NOTE: 240 clinical hours (~ 6 weeks) during the summer will be completed over the duration of this course. Prerequisites: VETN 300, VETN 310, VETN 311, VETN 330, VETN 340, VETN 341, VETN 345, VETN 350, VETN 430.

VETN 3111 - Veterinary Clinical Externship III
Hours: 5
This course consists of a supervised clinical experience in a work place. The primary objective is to reinforce and expand upon concepts learned by participating in actual cases and familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Nurse in a practical, applied atmosphere. The student is to achieve competency in skills and decision-making abilities commensurate with the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (CVTEA) requirements. NOTE: 300 clinical hours during the final semester will be completed over the duration of this course, but may be started over the winter break. Students will have Thursday and Fridays off in their final semester to allow of externship hours. Prerequisites: VETN 400, VETN 410, VETN 411, VETN 412, VETN 455, VETN 450, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 100 - Introduction to the Profession of Veterinary Medicine
Hours: 4
This course is designed to give students an overview of veterinary medicine from its origin to the present time. The course will include, but not be limited to: medical terminology, professionalism, legal and ethical aspects of veterinary practice, regulatory and government bodies, safety, sanitation and waste-disposal protocols, the human-animal bond, animal welfare, animal abuse, breeds of companion animals, professional associations, credentialing, roles of the veterinary team members, and careers. Note: this course is required for entrance into the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 140 - Veterinary Office Skills and Procedures
Hours: 1
This course is designed to cover the support skills needed in a veterinary office which are critical to the success or failure of a practice. This course will include, but not be limited to: telephone etiquette, client-based financial transactions, ethical and legal procedures, bookkeeping functions, scheduling, records and logs management, medical records, and inventory. Students will be introduced to one or more industry-standard veterinary software programs as well as word processing and spreadsheet software. Prerequisites: VETN 100 with a minimum grade of C or concurrent enrollment.

VETN 220 - Humane Treatment and Handling of Animals
Hours: 3
This course is designed to focus upon animal welfare and humane treatment during handling and restraint. Topics will include, but not be limited to: physical examination, behavior, husbandry, safety, equipment choice, and basic clinical procedures of all domestic species. NOTE: Handling of animals will include domestic small and large species with required participation. Prerequisites: VETN 100, ANS 319, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 250 - Veterinary Professional Communications
Hours: 3
This course is designed to cover professional communications that may be encountered in a veterinary practice. This course will include, but not be limited to: basic communication skills, psychology of client relations, client communication, leadership, social media, time and stress management, receptionist duties and dealing with difficult clients, malpractice, human-animal bond, euthanasia, death and dying, career goals, resume writing, and interviews. Prerequisites: ENG 1301, ENG 1302, PSY 2301.

VETN 300 - Clinical Veterinary Nutrition
Hours: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to applied animal nutrition. The course covers basic nutrition for both ruminant and simple-stomach animals. This course will include, but not be limited to: the basic elements of nutrition including the major categories of nutrients, and their sources, digestion, and metabolism, interpretation of pet food labels, homemade, raw, and commercial diets as well as therapeutic/critical care nutrition for dogs and cats. Both large and small animal feeds and feeding will be covered with companion animal nutrition as the focus. Common nutritional diseases and calculating the amount of food to feed dogs and cats during various stages of the life cycle will also be covered. Prerequisites: CHEM 1305 or CHEM 1311, ANS 319.

VETN 310 - Pharmacology for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 3
This course familiarizes students with the fundamental knowledge and pharmaceutical principles of veterinary related drugs. This course will include, but not be limited to: nomenclature, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, mechanisms of action, the applications to each body system, indications, contraindications, methods of administration, drug schedules and controlled substances. Emphasis is placed on the role the Veterinary Nurse plays in educating the client in the use of prescribed drugs in pets and production animals. The legal and ethical factors involved in handling pharmaceuticals are also considered. Prerequisites: MATH 1314, BSC 1411, CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1111, ANS 319, VETN 220, VETN 325, VETN 250, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 311.

VETN 311 - Pharmaceutical calculations for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 1
This course is designed to present the broad spectrum of information commonly referred to as posology, which is defined as the study of dose and dosage in the field of applied pharmacology. This course will include, but not be limited to: elementary algebra, general mathematics used by veterinary medical personnel involved in calculating dosages on common drugs, reading drug orders and labels, intravenous flow rates, and systems of measure, drug orders, and dose calculations to other calculations. The goal of this course is that each student be confident and capable of calculating correct drug doses regardless of the physical form of the medication. This course requires a strong background in algebra, the metric system, and an understanding of word problems. Prerequisites: MATH 1314, BSC 1411, CHEM 1311 or CHEM 1111, ANS 319, VETN 220, VETN 325, VETN 250, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 310.

VETN 319 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Structure and function of organ systems with special reference to domestic animals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319. Corequisites: VETN 320, ANS 320. Crosslisted with: ANS 319.

VETN 320 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals Laboratory
Hours: 1
Laboratory systematic study of the gross and microscopic anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. NOTE: Dissection of animal cadavers will be required of all students. Prerequisites: ANS 1319. Corequisites: ANS 319, VETN 319. Crosslisted with: ANS 320.

VETN 321 - Applied Anatomy & Pathophysiology of Domestic Animal Disease
Hours: 2
This course relates the normal physiology of the animal to the consequences of abnormal physiology, and discusses what effects this will have on organs and tissues in the body. Topics that will be explored include mechanisms of tissue destruction and repair, abnormal growth processes and neoplasia, pathophysiology. Clinical signs of organ dysfunction, pathophysiology, diagnostic tests and treatment/prevention strategies are discussed using case examples of selected important diseases. Topographical, applied and clinical anatomy of the cat and dog are also presented with special reference to clinically important anatomy for surgical and diagnostic imaging purposes. Prerequisites: ANS 1319. Corequisites: VETN 319, VETN 320, ANS 319, ANS 320.

VETN 325 - Animal Parasitology and Entomology
Hours: 3
This course introduces students to basic laboratory procedures and veterinary parasitology. This course will include, but not be limited to: basics of parasitism, life cycles, pathogenesis, identification, and control of common internal (nematodes, tapeworms, flukes, and protozoa) and external (insects, mites, lice, fleas and ticks) parasites of veterinary and zoonotic importance in domestic animals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, VETN 100, BSC 1406, non veterinary nursing students are not required to take corresponding VETN 326 Lab. Corequisites: VETN 326.

VETN 326 - Animal Parasitology and Entomology Laboratory
Hours: 1
Hands-on laboratory course regarding the study of parasitology principles and procedures commonly utilized in veterinary medicine. This course is also an introduction to laboratory procedures and will include microscope care and use, sample collection, basic diagnostic analysis of fecal and other specimens and identification of parasites. NOTE: This is the laboratory component of VETN 325 and must be taken in conjunction with it for all veterinary nursing students but is not required for non vet nursing majors. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, VETN 100, BSC 1406. Corequisites: VETN 325.

VETN 330 - Diagnostic Imaging for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 3
This hands on course is designed as an introduction to radiology and other types of imaging in a veterinary facility. This course will include, but not be limited to: radiation properties, x-ray production, radiographic equipment, darkroom procedures, the radiographic image, animal positioning and radiation safety. The use of ultrasound will be demonstrated and alternative technologies for imagining such as fluoroscopy, CT, MRI and nuclear scintigraphy will be discussed. In the laboratory portion of this course, students will be required to position patients, calculate exposure values, expose radiographic film and process it. Students will examine radiographs taken by their lab groups and critique them for their diagnostic quality. Prerequisites: ANS 319/ VETN 319, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 340 - Veterinary Clinical Pathology
Hours: 3
An introduction to Veterinary Clinical Pathology as it relates to normal and abnormal physiology of animal species. This course deals with the examination of blood, urine, exudates, and cells for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in veterinary practice. Topics include, but not be limited to: proper collection and preparation of biological samples, analysis of urine, blood, blood chemistry and cytological samples and necropsy procedure with sample collection. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, VETN 100, BSC 1406, CHEM 1305 or CHEM 1311, ANS 319. Corequisites: VETN 341.

VETN 341 - Veterinary Clinical Pathology Laboratory
Hours: 1
Hands-on laboratory course regarding the study of hematology, urine analysis, cytology and serum chemistry principles and procedures commonly utilized in veterinary medicine. This is the laboratory component of VETN 340 and must be taken in conjunction with it. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, VETN 100, BSC 1406, CHEM 1305 or CHEM 1311, ANS 319/ VETN 319. Corequisites: VETN 340.

VETN 345 - Small Animal Clinical Nursing Techniques
Hours: 3
This class is designed to be an introduction to nursing concepts and specific skills necessary for small animals. Students learn how to properly restrain cats and dogs, administer parenteral injections, take a patient history, complete medical records, conduct a physical examination, and perform clinical procedures related to primary patient care. Topics include, but not be limited to: including wound care and bandaging, diagnostic procedures for the ears and eyes, parenteral injection techniques, and administering medications. Prerequisites: VETN 220, VETN 319 & 321, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 350 - Large Animal Clinical Nursing Techniques
Hours: 2
Presents common large animal nursing skills. The course focuses on basic species knowledge, husbandry, physical examination, restraint, equipment and handling safety. The laboratory develops skills in bovine, equine, caprine, ovine handling and will include, but not be limited to: hoof trimming, vaccinations, dehorning, and castration methods, venipuncture, IV catheter placement, administering fluids and medications, bandaging and splinting techniques and neonatal care. Laboratory sessions will provide a hands-on teaching experience. Prerequisites: VETN 220, VETN 319 & 321, VETN 345, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 400 - Veterinary Surgical Nursing
Hours: 2
This course focuses on the veterinary nurses’ role in surgery. Topics include, but are not limited to: instruments, surgical support equipment, aseptic technique and proficiency in the proper preparation of the operating room. Skills such as intravenous catheter placement, proper endotracheal intubation, patient and surgical site preparation, and surgical pack preparation will be covered in class as well as VETN 412 Lab. Prerequisites: VETN 345 & 350 and current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 410, VETN 411, VETN 412.

VETN 410 - Anesthesiology for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 3
This lecture course presents basics of anesthesiology. The student will learn specific anesthetic agents and pharmaceuticals used in veterinary medicine, appropriate clinical indications, their proper dosages, side effects, and routes of administration. Other topics include but are not limited to: the principles of patient evaluation, induction and maintenance, anesthesia monitoring, care of the patient in and around the anesthetic period and control of post-surgical pain as well as client education for postoperative care. Hands on experience and skills will be developed in VETN 412 Laboratory. Prerequisites: VETN 345 & 350 and current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 411, VETN 412, VETN 400.

VETN 411 - Dentistry for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 2
This course will focus on dental anatomy, common dental diseases, and basic dental procedures. Topics will include, but not limited to: oral anatomy, terminology, instrumentation, proper charting, routine periodontal care common dental diseases, dental prophylaxis and oral radiography. Emphasis is on the role of the Veterinary Nurse in a small animal practice in providing dental services and client education on home dental care. Hands on experience and skills will be developed in VETN 412 Laboratory. Prerequisites: VETN 345 & 350 and current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 400, VETN 410, VETN 412.

VETN 412 - Anesthesia, Dentistry & Surgical Nursing Skills Laboratory I
Hours: 2
This is a laboratory class and emphasizes practical aspects of the surgical nursing, dentistry and anesthesia courses. Skills will include but not be limited to: aseptic technique, surgical instrumentation, preparation for surgical procedures, intravenous catheter placement, endotracheal intubation, patient monitoring, dental prophylaxis, oral charting and radiographic techniques. NOTE: Live animals are used in this course. Students are required to provide all pre and post care of patients used in labs and may be required to be at school after hours and/or on weekends. Prerequisites: VETN 345 & 350, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program. Corequisites: VETN 410, VETN 411, VETN 400.

VETN 413 - Anesthesia, Dentistry & Surgical Nursing Skills Laboratory II
Hours: 2
Continuation of skills and concepts from 412. Prerequisites: VETN 400, 410, 411 & 412, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 430 - Emergency & Critical Care for Veterinary Nurses
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to current emergency & critical care procedures for both large and small animals. A systematic approach will be taken in examining the physiology, treatment and care of emergency and critical care cases seen in practice. Physical findings, appropriate diagnostic testing, initial treatment, appropriate monitoring and follow-up are emphasized. Laboratories will include emergency simulations, clinical cases and critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: VETN 345, VETN 310, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 450 - Small Animal Disease & Management
Hours: 3
This course includes a general study of the more common and important diseases of small animals, their etiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Prerequisites: VETN 100, ANS 319.

VETN 455 - Large Animal Disease & Management
Hours: 3
This course includes a general study of the more common and important diseases of large animals, their etiology, pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Prerequisites: ANS 319, VETN 100.

VETN 460 - Lab Animal and Exotics Dz & Management
Hours: 2
Introduction to the husbandry, handling, restraint, care and use of exotics and laboratory animals. Includes discussion in common diseases, biosecurity, and public health. The care and use of laboratory animals will be covered in depth. Prerequisites: VETN 450, VETN 455, current enrollement in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 470 - Veterinary Nursing Senior Seminar - A Case Based Approach
Hours: 1
This course is designed to provide students in the Veterinary Nursing Program with a culminating experience to discuss and reflect on concepts that have been learned throughout the program of study. The students will also have the opportunity to present current topics and issues that are relevant to the veterinary profession and animal industry. Case-based presentations emphasize the basic pathophysiology of disease and clinical investigation and demonstrate the interactions between the clinical and basic sciences. Prerequisites: VETN 410, 411, 412, 450 & 455, senior standing, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 471 - VTNE Preparation
Hours: 1
This course prepares students for the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). Topics include test-taking strategies, formation of a study plan, and a review of topics from previous veterinary technology courses. Students enrolled in this course will develop essential test-taking skills by completing practice exams covering all major topics. Prerequisites: VETN 410, 411, 412, 450 & 455, senior standing, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 472 - Clinical Competency Final Evaluation
Hours: 1
Evaluates the students' clinical skills and knowledge after successful completion of all courses in the major, in order to prepare them for the national board examination and clinical practice. Evaluation of clinical skills and knowledge includes selected clinical laboratory techniques (parasitology, hematology, urinalysis, cytology, chemistry, serology, microbiology); diagnostic imaging; office procedures; surgical preparation, instrumentation and assistance; anesthesia induction, maintenance and monitoring; restraint and handling techniques; small, large and laboratory animal diagnostic and therapeutic techniques; and pharmacology calculations, labeling and drug classification. Prerequisites: VETN 410, 411, 412, 450 & 455, senior standing, current enrollment in the professional veterinary nursing program.

VETN 498 - Global Survey of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine
Hours: 3
This course is a study abroad opportunity for students to experience the animal industry in another country. Veterinary colleges, farms and other agricultral industries will be toured and students will participate in hands on learning experinces. Emphasis will be placed on learning about different cultures and how new knowledge can be applied to students lives and professions. NOTE: locations will rotate yearly Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

Rafael Bakhtavoryan
Assistant Professor
B.S., Armenian Agricultural Academy, M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Amanda DeLisle
Assistant Professional Track & Director of Veterinary Nursing
B.A., Austin College; ME.d, Texas A&M University; D.V.M., St. George's University, Dublin, Ireland

Desire Djidonou
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin Republic; M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Florida

Douglas Eborn
Assistant Professor
B.S., Utah State University; M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University

Derald Harp
Professor
B.S., M.S., Tarleton State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Randy M Harp
Professor and Dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources
B.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, M.S. New Mexico State University

Bradford Johnson
Instructor and Judging Team Coordinator
B.S., University of Nebraska; M.S., Purdue University

Curtis Jones
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Douglas D. LaVergne
Associate Professor and Assistant Dean
B.S., Southern University A&M College; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Jose A. Lopez
Associate Professor
B.B.A., Ave Maria College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Megan P. T. Owen
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., New Mexico State University, Ph.D., Mississippi State University

Kelly Reyna
Assistant Professor and Director of Sustainable Agriculture
B.S., Tarleton State University; M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., University of North Texas

Maggie Salem
Instructor
B.S., M.S., Texas A & M University-Commerce

Nathan Wells
Instructor
B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., New Mexico State University

Robert L. Williams
Professor
B.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ph.D., Texas Tech University