Literature and Languages

M. Hunter Hayes (Head)
Location: Hall of Languages, Room 141, 903-886-5260
Department Head: Hunter Hayes, Hunter.Hayes@tamuc.edu
Director, First-Year Composition:
Literature and Languages Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/litlang

The Department of Literature and Languages is a multidisciplinary department with programs and emphases in communication studies, English, linguistics, foreign languages, journalism, philosophy, radio & television, and affords opportunities to the student for academic enrichment through diverse offerings and an international faculty.

Degrees awarded are the Bachelor of Arts in English and Spanish; Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Sciences in Communication Studies, Journalism, and Radio and Television; the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees in English; the Master of Arts in Spanish; and the Ph.D. in English.

Courses in the Department of Literature and Languages improve the reading, writing, and analytical skills of students, offer insight into the use and structure of language, develop an understanding and appreciation of literature, explore film as an art form, and explore digital humanities. The programs offered for non-teaching majors are designed to prepare students to enter graduate study, or as basic preparation for professions such as broadcasting, journalism (news-editorial and public relations), law, publishing, ministry, broadcasting, government, advertising, free-lance writing, creative writing, copyediting and copywriting, and business communications. The programs prepare students to write effectively, to think and read critically and analytically, and to understand cultural and social differences to prepare students for an inter-connected world. Programs in the department emphasize the art of narrative and storytelling across multiple media for the public interest. Students in the programs receive ongoing opportunities for professional development and benefit from engaged mentorships with the faculty.  The department houses the Writing Center in its commitment to assisting writers at all levels.

English

In order to secure a well-balanced program, students majoring or minoring in English will elect their courses in accordance with the following plans of study:

  • Liberal Arts and Pre-Professional Major in English
  • Second Major, or Minor, in English
  • Teaching ESL Minor
  • TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Minor

Teacher Education Program

  • Secondary Teacher Certification, Grades 7-12
  • Middle Level Teaching Field in English/Language Arts/Reading, Grades 4-8
  • English as a Second Language Endorsement

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in the following major must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Teacher Education Programs in English/Language Arts

Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree in a teacher education program must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree (refer to the bachelor’s degree requirements section of this catalog);
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to that section of this catalog);
  3. requirements for admission to and retention in the Teacher Education Program (refer to the Center for Educator Certification and Academic Services section of this catalog); and
  4. professional development courses (refer to the appropriate departmental section in this catalog, e.g., Department of Curriculum & Instruction).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Students desiring concentrated study in English should choose one of the following:

  • Teacher Education Programs (English):
  • Secondary Education, Grades 7-12
  • Middle Level English/Language Arts/Reading, Grades 4-8
  • English as a Second Language Endorsement

TExES and Teacher Certification

Students seeking certification in English/Language Arts/Reading should consult with the TExES adviser for English in the department as early as possible, but no later than the beginning of their junior year.

Foreign Languages and Linguistics

This section of the Department of Literature and Languages offers instruction in understanding and speaking, reading, and writing as well as the study of literature in French and Spanish. The emphasis in all courses is on the student’s ability to communicate adequately in a foreign language. Beginning courses emphasize speaking and understanding the language and the culture of people who use the language; advanced courses emphasize reading, writing, and speaking the language, as well as analyzing literature.

Advanced placement with credit is available for students who have begun French or Spanish in high school and have a score of three or above on the appropriate CEEB examination.

The foreign language staff is especially interested in developing teachers of foreign languages in both the elementary and secondary schools. Interdisciplinary Studies majors are encouraged to choose Spanish as an academic specialization.

Students who enter the university with previous high school or college credits or with native language proficiency and who wish to enroll in the same language normally should continue without repeating equivalent work. Equivalent courses in the same language may not be repeated for credit. However, students with language experience may enroll in equivalent courses in the same language on a non-credit basis. Students may also request a placement examination and interview to determine the status of their preparation. One high school unit (year) may be equivalent to one college semester upon approval of the department head.

The language requirement for a Bachelor of Arts degree may be satisfied by FRE 131, FRE 132, FRE 231, FRE 232 or SPA 131, SPA 132, SPA 231, SPA 232, or the equivalent of these courses.

Philosophy

The philosophy offerings are designed to provide electives for students in any major area, but especially in the liberal arts. There are no formal prerequisites for any course.

The courses in philosophy introduce the student to some of the most enduring and challenging problems that we know and the attempts we have made to solve them. Students who take courses in philosophy enhance their ability to think critically and vigorously, analyze arguments, and express their views clearly and concisely, orally and in writing. Courses in philosophy are good preparation for students considering graduate studies, law, medicine, and work with government agencies and private corporations.

The Core Curriculum Requirement in (040) Literature, Philosophy, and Culture may be satisfied by completing   PHIL 1301, PHIL 331,PHIL 332, PHIL 360, PHIL 362and the Core Curriculum Requirement in (080) Social and Behavioral Sciences may be satisfied by completing PHIL 2303.

Spanish

Emphasis in Liberal Arts and Pre-Professional Programs Courses in Spanish enable the student to learn the Spanish language and become familiar with Hispanic culture. Majors in Spanish also study the outstanding figures of Spanish and Latin American literature and civilization and are prepared for careers in teaching, government service and private corporations. Students may choose to major or minor in Spanish. The plans of study include the following:

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in a non-teacher education major must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed.

Note: Oral proficiency is an integral component of language instruction at Texas A&M-Commerce. Before credit or equivalency is given for a foreign language correspondence course, the student requesting such credit or equivalency must demonstrate satisfactory oral proficiency in the language as determined by the department head.

Teacher Education Programs in Spanish

Students may choose to major or minor in Spanish or to elect Spanish as their field in the teacher education program.

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in a teacher education program must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree (refer to the bachelor’s degree requirements section of this catalog),
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to that section of this catalog),
  3. requirements for admission to and retention in the Teacher Education Program (refer to the Center for Educator Certification and Academic Services section of this catalog), and
  4. professional development courses (refer to the appropriate departmental section in this catalog, e.g., Department of Curriculum & Instruction).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed.

COMS 201 - Studies in Human/Communication
Hours: 3
A study of human communication and language process, speaking and listening and semantics and meaning. The course explores how humans are able to reach meaning and understanding through communication.

COMS 301 - Computer Mediated Communication
Hours: 3
Students will learn about the digital networked era, which is based on consuming ever-increasing content. This information can influence who we are and the relationships we have with others. We will examine fundamental aspects of interpersonal communication and consider how different types of computer-mediated communications (CMC) technologies such as e-mail, instant messaging, video conferencing, twitter and social network sites affect communication processes. Students will engage the web as critical writers and readers in order to move past being simply consumers and empower them in this digital networked era.

COMS 312 - Persuasion
Hours: 3
Speeches and techniques are of a persuasive nature. The course includes a critical analysis of the principles and methods influencing belief and action.

COMS 316 - Gender Communication
Hours: 3
Sex differences and similarities in communication will be explored. Different theoretical perspectives will be covered from which to study social behavior of the two sexes. Both verbal communication and nonverbal communication will be addressed across contexts

COMS 317 - Interpersonal Communication
Hours: 3
A study of environmental conditions that affect interpersonal interactions. Attention is given to verbal and non-verbal interactions, interpersonal behavior, communication models and networks, and social influences.

COMS 318 - GLB/Small Group Communication
Hours: 3
Theory and practice of communicating in small groups. Common barriers to communication will be examined.

COMS 319 - Leadership & Conflict Management
Hours: 3
An analysis within a framework of Communication Studies of the nature of leadership and conflict and the methods to resolve conflict with an emphasis on collaborative problem solving and mediation. Applying leadership and conflict management concepts, principles, strategies and techniques to your personal life. Prerequisites: COMS 201 with a minimum grade of C.

COMS 321 - Communication in the Classroom
Hours: 3
This course is a survey of communication processes, theories, and skills applied in the educational context. Emphasis is placed upon knowledge and skills needed for interaction between teachers and students, and facilitation of learning in a variety of modes and situations. This course aims at having a complete understanding through philosophical and applied research approaches. Quality presentation-making is one of the most prevalent and important job tasks for teachers today. In light of this, presentation assignments in this course stress basic skills of idea generation, message development, and message delivery. Practice is provided in skills and principles associated with presentations, discussions, and collaborative activities.

COMS 389 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies.

COMS 392 - Nonverbal Communication
Hours: 3
Nonverbal Communication will explore different aspects of nonverbal communication. The class is structured to first build an understanding of nonverbal communication from an academic standpoint. A theoretical perspective will be understood. Then, the areas of visual and auditory codes (kinesics, physical appearance, and vocalics); contact codes (haptics and proxemics); place and time codes (environment, artifacts, and chronemics); relationship between verbal and NV communication; emotion and NV behavior; NV coding and decoding of deception will be addressed. A major portion of the course will apply nonverbal communication to students’ lives. An understanding of interpreting different nonverbal messages will be covered.

COMS 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

COMS 401 - Conflict Management
Hours: 3
An analysis of the nature of conflict and the methods to resolve conflict through communication with an emphasis on collaborative problem solving and mediation. Applying conflict management concepts, principles, and techniques to personal life.

COMS 406 - Nonverbal Communication
Hours: 3
Nonverbal Communication will explore different aspects of nonverbal communication. The class is structured to first build an understanding of nonverbal communication from an academic standpoint. A theoretical perspective will be understood, then the areas of visual and auditory codes (kinesics, physical appearance, and vocalics); contact codes (haptics and proxemics); place and time codes (environment, artifacts, and chronemics). Relationship between verbal and NV communication; emotion and NV behavior; NV coding and decoding of deception will be addressed. A major portion of the course to follow will apply nonverbal communication to students’ lives. An understanding of interpreting different nonverbal messages will be covered.

COMS 407 - Communication Research Methods & Theory
Hours: 3
This course is a survey of basic human communication research methods focused on developing competencies at various levels. The primary goal is for students to better understand and apply how research is conducted in communication studies. Emphasis is placed in three primary areas of human communication research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Critical Studies. The understanding and application of theory used in research will also be covered. Students will write papers that can lead up to research studies.

COMS 408 - GLB/Intercultural Communication
Hours: 3
Overview of the study of cross-cultural communication. Includes a survey of nonwestern culture, communication concepts, intercultural communication problems and approaches to their resolution. Introduces students to the differences in meaning between co-cultures.

COMS 412 - Theory of Communication
Hours: 3
A survey of communication from Aristotle to modern times.

COMS 414 - Political Communication
Hours: 3
Communication by individuals, groups, and the mass media as major political influences on public policy decisions.

COMS 418 - Communication & Social Change
Hours: 3
The study of the role of communication and mass media in social change. Emphasis is given to the mass media as a prime component for change, although community action and interpersonal approaches are included. Students investigate methods employed by opinion leaders and change agents to accomplish specific goals. Variables addressed include how media defines and disseminates information about issues, how advertising promotes or rejects issues, how lifestyles are portrayed with respect to issues, and how mass media ownership and regulatory policies affect the communication act.

COMS 422 - Organizational Communication
Hours: 3
The focus of this class will be on the traditions/approaches, theories, and research findings concerning conceptions of organizations, various traditions in the study of organizations, metaphors for organizational communication, culture and climate within organizations, group processes, leadership, socialization/assimilation/membership, negotiation, power, motivation/performance, organizational innovation and change, team based structures and alternative forms of organizing, and strategic organizational communication.

COMS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head or speech communication head.

COMS 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis.

COMS 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Honors Readings.

COMS 1315 - Fund of Public Speaking
Hours: 3
(SPCH 1315) SPC 111 - Fundamentals of Speech. Three semester hours. Basic course in organizing and developing effective oral communication. Particular stress is placed on voice and diction, and general public speaking.

COMS 1321 - Business/Prof Speaking
Hours: 3
Designed to aid the prospective business or professional person in preparing various types of speaking assignments such as he/she might encounter in his/her career. It is planned for agriculture and business majors, and for other students seeking one course in public speaking. Emphasis is upon structure and techniques of presentation.

ENG 100 - Introduction to College Reading & Writing
Hours: 3
A non-credit course providing anIntroduction to College Reading and Writing. Three semester hours (3 lecture). (Non-credit) An introduction to the elements of literacy necessary for college-level reading and writing. In this course, students receive substantial feedback and instructors tailored to their specific needs. This course serves as a support course for ENG 1301 and is required of those students who are not Texas Success Initiative (TSI) complete in either reading and/or writing, but this course is also available to anyone who may desire additional support for ENG 1301. May not be used to satisfy any degree requirement.

ENG 104 - Basic Listening & Speaking for International Students
Hours: 3
A non-credit course for international students or students whose native language is not English and who need help with their academic English. Students work on a variety of tasks, skills, and techniques designed to improve their listening and speaking skills. The focus of instruction is on hands-on knowledge directly relevant to the performance of the students in their other courses. May not be used to satisfy any degree requirement.

ENG 105 - Basic Reading and Writing for International Students
Hours: 3
A non-credit course for international students or students whose native language is not English and who need help with their academic English. Students work on a variety of tasks, skills, and techniques designed to improve their reading and writing skills. The focus of instruction is on hands-on knowledge directly relevant to the performance of the students in their other courses. May not be used to satisfy any degree requirements.

ENG 110 - Developmental Writing and Reading
Hours: 3
A non-credit course designed to help students work through the various reading and writing projects assigned in their writing-intensive courses. Students work in small groups with a peer tutor in order to sharpen abilities to read the imperatives of a given writing or reading project/situation and shape discourse to successfully address these imperatives. Much emphasis is placed on the important ways that the reading or writing process used must take into account the writing or reading task at hand. Required of those students who have not passed the reading portion of the TASP exam and those needing additional assistance following English 100, but also available to anyone who may desire supplemental assistance to English 101 or other writing-intensive courses.

ENG 189 - INDEPENDENT STUDY
Hours: 1-4

ENG 200 - Popular Literature and Culture
Hours: 3
This course may cover a single popular medium, genre, author, or theme, such as science fiction, fantasy, mystery, romance, western, or horror, among others. This course may include popular literature in translation.

ENG 202 - Multi-Ethnic American Literature
Hours: 3
A non credit course is designed to give students knowledge of the ethnic diversity of American literature at the same time that they improve their skills in reading and interpreting literature and in writing. The course covers material from at least three of the following ethnic groups: Native American, African American, Hispanic American, and American Eskimo. Other ethnic groups may also be included. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 205 - Humor in the Humanities
Hours: 3
An introduction to foundational concepts in the humanities through humor: Humor is a universal human behavior with crucial functions in all spheres of life. The course is designed to introduce students to major historical, social, psychological, literary, communicative concepts in the humanities as they manifest in humor. The course is designed to develop critical thinking habits, and the student may be required to make analyses and value judgments based on critical thought.

ENG 300 - Reading, Analyzing, Teaching Literature
Hours: 3
A course that introduces students who are pre-service teachers to the reading process and critical reading strategies designed to better prepare them to understand the reading/writing connection, literary terminology, literary analysis, and research skills, in both pedagogical and analytical modes. In addition to examining the TEKS and TExES competencies for middle school and secondary English/Language majors, the course provides support for pre-professional development through a variety of substantive projects. Prerequisites: ENG 333, 2 upper level literature courses and preferred completion of one of the required reading courses.

ENG 301 - Modern Grammar
Hours: 3
A course that guides students thorough analysis of the sentence-level grammar of English employing contemporary as well as more traditional methodologies. It emphasizes the relationship between the structure of language and that of everyday experience and develops an appreciation of change and variation. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 305 - Children's Literature
Hours: 3
A survey of children's literature. The course includes various authors and illustrators in such genres as the oral tradition, fantasy, realistic and historical fiction, poetry, and the picture book. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 311 - Shakespeare
Hours: 3
(1, even years; 3 or 4, odd years) A study of Shakespear's selected comedies, histories, and tragedies. Plays studied may include As You Like It; Henry IV, Part I; King Lear; and others. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 313 - English Usage and Composition
Hours: 0-3
A course to help students become proficient in Standard English Usage and to offer future teachers opportunities to learn how to teach usage in the context of student writing. This course will not count toward the major or minor or toward certification.

ENG 315 - Advanced Writing: Creative Writing
Hours: 3
An introduction to creative writing through reading and analyzing models of selected genre or genres. In a workshop atmosphere, students share their writings and critique each other's work and learn the practical problems of preparing work for submission and marketing. Genres selected for a semester's focus may include: poetry, fiction, biography, community history, or screenplay. May be repeated once when the emphasis changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 317 - Word Building
Hours: 3
A course planned to help students increase their vocabulary primarily through a study of the formation of English words from Latin and Greek roots. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 323 - Mythology
Hours: 3
A course that focuses on the myths of the Greeks and Romans but may also include myths from other cultures such as the Norse and American Indian. The course emphasizes the influence of myths in literature and psychology and on enlargement of vocabulary through mastery of words derived from mythology. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 331 - Introduction to Linguistics
Hours: 3
A survey of major areas of linguistic theory: phonology, morphology, syntax, historical/comparative studies, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 332 - Pre-Law Composition
Hours: 3
Pre-Law Composition. Three semester hours. (1, even years) This course is designed for any student planning to go on to law school or a paralegal career. It concentrates on clear, correct, and well-reasoned writing. The primary emphasis is on writing effective answers on hypothetical legal case problems. Analytic, logical, and problem-solving skills are stressed. Some attention is given to the nature of the law school and its admissions requirements. Prerequisite: ENG 1302.

ENG 333 - Advanced Writing: Non-Fiction
Hours: 3
A course that provides an intensive study of the principles of nonfictional composition through the analysis of examples from classic and modern writings and practice in the application of those principles. The course emphasizes rhetorical organization and the techniques of expository writing. Students devote much time to writing and editing their own work. Prerequisites: ENG 1302 and sophomore standing.

ENG 336 - British Poetry
Hours: 3
A study of the development of form, versification, and style in British poetry. Reading includes selected poems from the Old English period to the twentieth century. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 341 - Technical Writing
Hours: 3
A study of techniques regarding objective reporting on scientific and technical material; principles of technical exposition; study of language uses; writing samples and principles of various technical reports, including abstracts, proposals, and manuals. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 351 - American Novel Before World War I
Hours: 3
A study of significant American novels written before World War I. Authors to be studied may include Adams, Cooper, Dreiser, Garland, Hawthorne, James, Jewett, Melville, Poe, Twain, Warren, Wharton, and others. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 352 - American Novel After World War I
Hours: 3
A study of significant American novels written after World War I. Authors to be studied may include Bellow, Cather, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Porter, Steinbeck, Walker, Warren, Welty, Wright, Updike, and others. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 355 - Women Writers
Hours: 3
(1, even years; 3 or 4, odd years) A study of literature by written by women. This course may cover specific historical periods (e.g., U.S. or Latin America texts after 1950), cultural groups (e.g., Black, Chicana, Asian-American, Native American), or specific genre or genres (e.g., science fiction, poetry). The course may be repeated once when the course emphasis changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 358 - Language & Society
Hours: 3
A study of human social behavior and sociocultural interaction as they constrain language acquisition, use, and structure. Topics include sociolinguistic relativity, communicative competence, multilingualism, social and regional dialects, speech-act types, language styles, gender-related issues, and sociolinguistic field methodology. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 388 - Shaping the Future
Hours: 3
A study of alternate possibilities for the future and the causes that might bring about those possibilities. The class focus may cover texts from different historical periods, different genres, and different cultures. The course may be repeated once when the course emphasis changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 399 - Literary and Research Methods
Hours: 3
An advanced study of the basic principles and methods of literary analysis. The course emphasizes the mastery of formal literary terminology a coverage of basic critical methodologies and a thorough understanding of research techniques specific to the field. Required of all English majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1302 and sophomore standing.

ENG 403 - The Discipline of English
Hours: 3
A course designed primarily for those pursuing teacher certification in secondary English. Reading materials address methods of teaching composition, grammar, and literature in secondary schools and the competencies of the state-mandated teacher certification test for secondary English. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 406 - Adolescent Literature
Hours: 3
A course that introduces parents and prospective teachers of middle, junior high, and senior high schools to the major authors and genres of adolescent, or "young adult," literature. Classroom applications are discussed, but the emphasis is on the interpretation and evaluation of the literature itself. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 420 - Approaches to Literature
Hours: 3
An introduction to historical and contemporary theoretical and critical approaches to textual analysis within the discipline of literary studies. Different methods and theories may be chosen for the course, but the goal is to improve learners' skills in reading, discussing and writing about texts from a variety of genres and media. Prerequisites ENG 1302.

ENG 424 - Development of the English Language
Hours: 3
A study of the vocabulary and sound systems of modern English through careful consideration of the sociocultural, geographic and linguistic roots of the language. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 425 - Development of the Novel
Hours: 3
A study of British novels important in the history of the genre from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century, chosen from such authors as Fielding, Austen, Dickens, Hardy, Woolf, and others. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 432 - History and Aesthetics of Film
Hours: 3
Historical and aesthetic survey of film from the late nineteenth century to the present. The interdependence of technology and art is examined through the study of significant motion pictures that continue to influence contemporary filmmakers and reflect changing social and cultural values. Prerequisites: ENG 1302. Satisfies visual and performing arts option of Core Curriculum.

ENG 434 - Literature and Film
Hours: 3
A study of the interrelationships between film and literature and the unique qualities of each medium. The course also examines film adaptations of literary works, films and literature that focus on similar themes, and the differences in reading and perceiving different types of texts. Prerequisites: ENG 1302. Satisfies visual and performing arts option of Core Curriculum.

ENG 441 - A Survey of American Literature I
Hours: 3
The development of American literature from Colonial times to the Civil War. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 442 - A Survey of American Literature II
Hours: 3
A study of the development of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 443 - Latino/a Literature
Hours: 3
A study of the diverse literary traditions surrounding the Latino/a experience in the United States. The course undertakes an exploration of such various narrative forms such as poetry, drama, the novel, the graphic narrative, film, and the short story, as well as an understanding of the political and historical contexts from which these texts emerge. Readings will concentrate on an array of Latino/a subgroups, including Mexican American (Chicano/a), Cuban American, Puerto Rican American, Dominican American, and Central and South American émigré authors. Literary themes such as sexuality and gender, Chicana Feminisim, borderland studies, bilingualism, and immigration are potential topics for investigation. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1301, ENG 1302.

ENG 444 - African Diasporic Literatures
Hours: 3
This course may cover any African diasporic literature from specific historical periods (from the 16th through the 21st centuries), any national or cultural literatures (African-American literature, Afro-Caribbean literature, Afro-Hispanic literature, etc.), any genre (poetry, plays, fiction, science fiction), or any theme (Afrofuturism, Black Women in the African Diaspora, Black Atlantic Literature, etc.). The course may be repeated once when the course emphasis changes.

ENG 450 - Studies in American Narratives
Hours: 3
A study of various aspects of American literature, concentrating on diverse genres, (e.g. novels, poetry, graphic narratives, creative nonfiction), literary movements, (e.g. Harlem Renaissance, transcendentalism), time frames (e.g. late nineteenth-century literature, post-9/11 literature), authors from all literary traditions; and historical and social themes. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1301, ENG 1302.

ENG 451 - Twentieth-Century British Literature
Hours: 3
A study of British poetry, fiction, and drama in the twentieth century, including works of such authors as Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, Eliot, and selected contemporary writers. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 457 - Teaching English as a Second Language
Hours: 3
An investigation of the linguistic, psychological, and sociocultural foundations for teaching English to speakers of other languages. It surveys historical, and current trends in the methods and materials of ESL, of language testing, and of language-program evaluation. Also appropriate for students interested in teaching second or foreign languages other than English. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 460 - Creative and Scholarly Publishing
Hours: 3
A practicum for students interested in publishing their creative or academic work. Students work on preparing their work for publication, and researching potential markets, including how to submit work for publication. Extensive research on publishing and peer critiques. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 462 - Language Acquisition and Processing
Hours: 3
A survey of the cognitive, affective and developmental constraints on language acquisition and use. Topics include language, brain and mind; multilingualism; first and second language acquisition; evolution and change in the representational systems of humans and other animals; and research methods.Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 471 - Survey of English Literature I
Hours: 3
A survey of a thousand years of British literature, from (roughly) 800 to 1800. It may begin with an introduction to Old English (e.g., Beowulf) and Middle English poetry (e.g., Chaucer), proceeding through the Renaissance (e.g., Jonson, Webster, and Shakespeare) and concluding with the Age of Reason (e.g., Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson). Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 472 - Survey of English Literature II
Hours: 3
A survey of British literature published during the past two centuries, starting with the Romantics and the Victorians. The 20th century may include poets of the Great War, the Modernists, and late-century and contemporary authors. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 474 - Topics in World Literature
Hours: 3
Selected readings in world literature, including texts in translation, with emphasis on cultural aspects and interdisciplinary approaches to the countries represented. The course focuses on, but is not limited to, European countries. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 485 - Advanced Writing: Forms and Genres
Hours: 3
An advanced; and intensive; reading and writing course that focuses on a specific genre of poetry or prose based on instructor specialization. Students read and write in the assigned genre. Extensive writing and peer critiques. May be repeated for credit when the genre changes. Prerequisites: ENG 1302.

ENG 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 3
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: consent of department head.

ENG 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis. Three semester hours.

ENG 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individual Honors Readings. Three semester hours.

ENG 495 - Internship
Hours: 3
Internship. Three semester hours. Approved work experience in a professional organization. Supervision under the guidance of a practicing professional and departmental faculty member. May be repeated once when the internship organization changes. Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of the department head.

ENG 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-3
Special Topics. One to Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 497A - Special Topic
Hours: 1-3
Special Topics. One to Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ENG 1301 - US-College Reading & Writing
Hours: 3
(ENGL 1301) College Reading and Writing. Three semester hours. (1, 2; 3 or 4) Introduces students to writing as an extended, complex, recursive process and prepares students for English 102, which more rigorously examines the forms and structures of argument and means to approaching multiple audiences. In 101 students will write weekly, and will work on essay organization and development. The course will emphasize close reading, summarizing, and analysis of expository texts, including student writing.

ENG 1302 - GLB/US-Written Argument/Research
Hours: 3
This course provides students with advanced training in communication skills emphasizing the writing and reading of argumentative prose and adapting writing to alternate audiences. Students will write weekly, including such texts as journals, reading response logs, summaries of argumentative texts, argumentative papers, and longer papers integrating secondary research. Activities include close reading of sample texts, both student and professional. Some sections will emphasize special topics in both reading and writing. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in English 1301 or advanced placement or CLEP.

ENG 2326 - US-Intro to Literature
Hours: 3
(ENGL 2326) Introduction to Literature. Three semester hours. (1, 2; 3 or 4) An introduction to the three major genres of literature: poetry, drama, and fiction. The course is designed to develop discriminating reading habits, and the student may be required to make analyses and value judgments based on critical thought. Prerequisite: ENG 1302.

ENG 2331 - US-Lit of Western World
Hours: 3
(ENGL 2331) Literature of the Western World. Three semester hours. A study of selected works of fiction, poetry, and drama in the literature of western civilization from classical times to the present. Authors covered may include Sophocles, Virgil, Dante, Voltaire, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Mann, and Eliot. Prerequisite: ENG 1302.

FLL 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 0-4

FLL 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Hours: One to four - Organized class Note May be graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis. May be repeated when topics vary

FRE 131 - Elementary French I
Hours: 3-4
(FREN 1311) Elementary French I. Three semester hours. Introduction to the four language skills: speaking, writing, listening and reading. Emphasis on the spoken language. Introduction to French and Francophone cultures.

FRE 132 - Elementary French II
Hours: 3-4
(FREN 1312) Elementary French II. Three semester hours. A continuation of FRE 131 with further emphasis on the spoken language. Prerequisite: French 131 or approved placement or CLEP or consent of department head.

FRE 231 - Intermediate French I
Hours: 3
(FREN 2311) Intermediate French I. Three semester hours. Review and expansion of the four language skills with emphasis on speaking and writing, and further exposure to French and Francophone cultures. Prerequisites: French 131 and 132 or approved placement or CLEP or consent of department head.

FRE 232 - Intermediate French II
Hours: 3
(FREN 2312) Intermediate French II. Three semester hours. A continuation of FRE 231 with emphasis on reading comprehension and writing skills. Introduction to French prose, poetry or drama. Prerequisite: French 231.

FRE 289 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4

FRE 331 - Advanced French I
Hours: 3
Advanced French I: Written Emphasis. Three semester hours. Improves composition skills by the implementation of three major components: grammar review and refinement; reading and analysis of various kinds of texts, both literary and journalistic; composition assignments involving such techniques as description, analysis, and persuasion. Prerequisite: French 232.

FRE 332 - Advanced French II
Hours: 3
Advanced French II: Oral Emphasis. Three semester hours. Improves oral comprehension and production. Listening skills will be enhanced through French and Francophone radio, television and film. Speaking skills will be honed by class discussions based on current events in the newspapers and magazines of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: French 232.

FRE 450 - Major Literary Figures
Hours: 3
Major Literary Figures. Three semester hours. A survey of the major literary figures of French or Francophone literatures. French authors treated may include Marie de France, Rabelais, Ronsard, Montaigne, Corneille, Racine, Moliére, Marivaux, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Balzac, Hugo, Camus, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet and Duras. Francophone authors treated may include Camara Laye, Nafissatou Diallo, Cheikh Sow, Calixthe Beyala, Tahar Ben Jelloun, Assia Djebar, Patrick Chamoiseau, Maryse Condé, Joseph Zobel, Gabrielle Roy and Roch Carrier.

FRE 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

FRE 490 - Honors Thesis
Hours: 3-6

FRE 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3

FRE 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

JOUR 115 - PUBLICATION DESIGN & PRODUCTIO
Hours: 3
Publication Design and Production. Three semester hours. An introduction to programs for application to print publications such as newspapers, magazines, and newsletters. Instruction in the fundamentals of layout and design in electronic publishing. Required of all sequence majors.

JOUR 197 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4

JOUR 214 - Basic Reporting
Hours: 3
(COMM 2311) Basic Reporting. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). A beginning course in the gathering and writing of news with an emphasis on interviewing and the basic types of stories. Assignments will include work to be submitted to the student newspaper. Laboratory hours each week. Students must be able to type.

JOUR 260 - Advertising Principles
Hours: 3
(COMM 2327) Advertising Principles. Three semester hours. A survey course in advertising as one aspect of promotion. Examines the historical background, social and economic environments, media channels, and other basics of the field as the beginning for further study in advertising. Prerequisite: JOUR 1307 or consent of the instructor.

JOUR 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4

JOUR 314 - Intermediate Reporting
Hours: 3
Intermediate Reporting. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). A continuation of JOUR 214 with emphasis on developing the students' news sense, judgment, interpretive news presentation, and reporting skills to produce in-depth stories using multiple sources of information. Assignments will include work to be submitted to the student newspaper. Laboratory hours each week. Prerequisite: JOUR 214 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 315 - Editing & Production
Hours: 3
Editing and Production. Three semester hours (1 lecture, 4 lab). Focus is on the concerns of the news editor, including copyediting, headline writing, and newspaper design. Laboratory work consists of copyediting, layout, and headline writing for fully-paginated student publications. Prerequisite: JOUR 115.

JOUR 316 - Community Newspaper Journalism
Hours: 3
Topics in Community Newspaper Journalism. Three semester hours. This course explores various topics in community newspaper journalism, including photojournalism, business-related operations such as advertising and circulation, newspaper management, technology, and community relations. Prerequisites: JOUR 1307 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 326 - Adv Reporting/Feature Wrt
Hours: 1-3
Advanced Reporting/Feature Writing. Three semester hours. (2 lecture, 2 lab) An advanced course integrating writing, reporting and news feature writing skills. Assignments will include work to be submitted to the student newspaper. Laboratory hours each week. Prerequisite: JOUR 315 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 328 - Public Relations Principles
Hours: 3
An introduction to the fundamentals of public relations and the functions of reputation management. A beginning examination of publics, research techniques, media outlets, and public relations techniques. Prerequisites: JOUR 1307 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 329 - Wrtg for Public Relations
Hours: 3
Writing for Public Relations. Three semester hours. The preparation of and writing of various documents in the field of public relations with both lecture and laboratory sessions. Emphasis is upon writing and research for public relations formats. Prerequisite: JOUR 328 or consent of the instructor.

JOUR 330 - Case Studies in Advertising
Hours: 3
The case-study method is utilized to explore contemporary advertising and marketing issues. Students will explore the execution of cases and analyze the elements utilized in the management of the cases. Prerequisites: JOUR 260.

JOUR 332 - Advertising Campaigns
Hours: 3
A focus on the strategic elements in developing an advertising campaign for clients. Students will prepare a campaign for a designated on-campus or off-campus business, service, or institution, or non-profit. Prerequisites: JOUR 260.

JOUR 335 - Media History
Hours: 3
Media History. Three semester hours. A survey of the origins and development of journalism and the mass media from their beginnings in Germany and England to the present time. Emphasis on the ideas, economic forces, and cultural realities touching the development of American journalism. Prerequisite: JOUR 1307 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 336 - Media Law
Hours: 3
Media Law. Three semester hours. A study of the First Amendment and the significant legal decisions affecting print, broadcast, and interactive media. Particular attention is focused on Supreme Court decisions. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

JOUR 350 - VISUAL COMM FOR NEWS PUBLICATI
Hours: 3
Visual Communication for News Publications. Three semester hours. An introduction to preparing visual documents for use in print publications. Digital cameras are used to introduce the essentials of composition, selection, and editing of images. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

JOUR 351 - Intro to Photojournalism
Hours: 4
Introduction to Photojournalism - 3 Lec/ 2 Lab An introduction to photojournalism. This class covers techniques and equipment needed when shooting for publication and places an emphasis on producing digital images. Cross list with PHO 351

JOUR 352 - Advaanced Photojournalism
Hours: 4
Advanced Photojournalism - Four semester hours Photojournalism students will refine their photo reporting skills while expanding techniques to include visual storytelling and documenting with emerging technology. Students must be published. An emphasis will be placed on students publishing assignments to further portfolios. Critiques will be an integral part of the course. Cross listed with PHO 352. Pre-requisites : JOUR 351/Art 351

JOUR 380 - Magazine Production
Hours: 3
Magazine Production and Editing - Three semester hours An advanced course to build on JOUR 115 and to introduce our majors to the field of magazine journalism. The students will learn the fundamentals of magazine writing, production and editing, which differ significantly from similar newspaper skills. Pre-requisites : JOUR 115 and JOUR 214

JOUR 389 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study - Hours: One to four Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites Consent of department head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

JOUR 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

JOUR 425 - Public Relations Case Studies
Hours: 3
Public Relations Case Studies. Three semester hours. An analysis and evaluation of contemporary public relations problems in public and private organizations. Case studies are examined. Prerequisite: JOUR 328 and 329 or consent of instructor.

JOUR 426 - Public Relations Campaigns
Hours: 3
Public Relations Campaigns. Three semester hours. The planning, implementation, and analysis of public relations campaigns. Examination of the role of research in such campaigns. Prerequisites: JOUR 328, 329, 425 or consent of the instructor.

JOUR 445 - US-Ethics in the Media
Hours: 3
Ethics in the Media. Three semester hours. (Capstone) This is a course about ethical issues raised by contemporary mass media practices, especially those related to news, advertising, and public relations. Students will learn to recognize and analyze problem situations in terms of a framework of ethical principles in a societal context shaped by the libertarian traditions of Enlightenment thought. Communitarian challenges to those traditions will be studied and their impact on media ethics and practices explored. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.

JOUR 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of Journalism division coordinator

JOUR 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Individual Honors Thesis.

JOUR 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Honors Readings.

JOUR 495 - Media Internship
Hours: 3
Media Internship. Three semester hours. Approved work experience in a media organization such as a community newspaper or public relations firm. Supervision by professionals and faculty. Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the department head.

JOUR 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

JOUR 1307 - US-Mass Commun in Society
Hours: 3
(COMM 1307) Mass Communication in Society. Three semester hours. A discursive study of mass media organizations, how they operate and exert their influence on individuals and society, enabling students to become knowledgeable and self critical consumers of mass media content. The emphasis will be on those media engaged in news and public affairs reporting and commentary, especially the press and television.

PHIL 331 - GLB/US-History of Philosophy I
Hours: 3
Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance philosophy. Greek philosophy from the beginnings (Thales, Anaximenes, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides, the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras) to Plato's and Aristotle's rationalism, Epicure, the Stoics, and the Skeptics. Satisfies Humanities option of University Studies. Prerequisite: ENG 1302

PHIL 332 - US-History of Philosophy II
Hours: 3
History of Philosophy II. Three semester hours. From the Age of Reason to the present, this course may include Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Comte, Nietzsche, Bergson, and Husserl. Satisfies Humanities option of University Studies. Prerequisite: ENG 1302

PHIL 360 - US-General Ethics
Hours: 3
General Ethics. Three semester hours. Theories concerning the nature of the good life, human conduct in society, value judgments, ethical standards, and current ethical issues. Satisfies Humanities option of University Studies. Prerequisite: ENG 1302

PHIL 362 - US-Aesthetics
Hours: 3
Aesthetics. Three semester hours. (2, odd years) Analysis of aesthetic experience. Problems of "taste" and evaluation in music, literature, painting, architecture, etc. Satisfies Humanities option of University Studies. Prerequisite: ENG 1302

PHIL 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. Three or four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

PHIL 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis.

PHIL 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individual Honors Readings.

PHIL 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. Three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PHIL 1301 - GLB/US-Intro to Philosophy
Hours: 3
A general introduction to critical thinking and logic. Study of basic questions of existence and knowledge. Satisfies Humanities option of University Studies. Prerequisite: ENG 1302

PHIL 2303 - GLB/US-Logic
Hours: 3
An introduction to nonformal logic and argumentation theory. The course emphasizes clear analysis of written arguments, common fallacies of reasoning, major types of arguments, and the relationships of argument principles to variant argument fields. Prerequisite: ENG 1302.

RTV 101 - Multimedia Writing
Hours: 3
Basic journalistic writing techniques common to all media. Fundamentals of print, broadcast and Internet-oriented writing. integration of news gathering, writing and editing; ethics to establish a firm foundation for journalism, including basic reporting skills. Students will be required to read daily newspapers and online media, view/listen to TV and radio news; master the basics of Associated Press style and report and write on deadline. Basics of grammar and spelling.

RTV 109 - Media Operations I
Hours: 1
Supervised practice and instruction in radio-TV or other electronic media experiences including: radio announcing; radio production; television performance; television production; online video, visual, audio and/or textual production; and other activities related to the production of radio-TV programs and projects. Note: Required of all RTV majors for each semester of study. Practicum is required in addition to the regular course of study.

RTV 151 - Communication Technology
Hours: 3
Communication Technology. Three semester hours. (1, 2) A study of the processes and user interactions of communication technologies. The course covers the foundation of technologies used for audio and video production and the foundation of digital content distribution. Topics include personal computer and Internet historical developments, broadband, satellites, fiber optics, video gaming and virtual reality.

RTV 209 - Media Operations II
Hours: 1
Supervised practice and instruction in radio-TV or other electronic media experiences including: radio announcing; radio production; television performance; television production; online video, visual, audio and/or textual production; and other activities related to the production of radio-TV programs and projects. Practicum is required in addition to the regular course of study. (2nd level, 3rd level, 4th level; May be repeated for credit.)

RTV 215 - Media Performance
Hours: 3
(COMM 2331) Media Performance. Three semester hours. (1, 2) A study of the principles of announcing and talent in radio, television and associated fields, including preparation and performance of commercials, news, interviews and similar broadcast-style content. Includes coverage of theory and practices in the broadcasting industry from the writing, studio and production points of view

RTV 221 - Basic Audio Production and Radio Programming
Hours: 3
Lectures and laboratory experience in audio production equipment, methods, and techniques. Emphasis is placed on radio programming and production. Attention is given to radio formats, new technology, production skills and program management. Laboratory experience includes work with KKOM student radio and/or KETR Radio.

RTV 309 - Media Operations III
Hours: 1
Supervised practice and instruction in radio-TV or other electronic media experiences including: radio announcing; radio production; television performance; television production; online video, visual, audio and/or textual production; and other activities related to the production of radio-TV programs and projects. Practicum is required in addition to the regular course of study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: RTV 109 and RTV 209.

RTV 320 - Broadcast Writing
Hours: 3
A study of the techniques, style, and format of script preparation for the radio and television media. Scripts include commercial, news documentary, and dramatic programs.

RTV 322 - Film-Style Shooting & Editing
Hours: 3
This course teaches the technical skills and creative principles required for single camera ('film style') video field shooting and post production using Final Cut Pro®. Topics include audio, video recording technology, composition, lighting, continuity, and editing. Experience planning, shooting and editing entertainment- and/or information-based video projects will be provided through hands-on exercises, projects and assignments.

RTV 326 - Electro Media Sales/Operations
Hours: 3
An examination of the sales, programming, and management functions of broadcast and online media operations. Advertising techniques, audience ratings, and basic commercial practices will be examined, as will traditional and contemporary media programming and operations as related to developing content for an audience and monetizing that content

RTV 332 - Advanced Digital Video Production
Hours: 3
Lectures and laboratory experiences in control room and studio procedures for television broadcasting. Provides the students with an opportunity for learning pre-production, production and post-production of television programs using field shooting for pre-production and multi-camera production techniques of a TV studio. Experiences provided include operation of cameras, control panels, lights, and audio in directing and producing nondramatic programs such as news, commercials, and interviews. Attention is given to the television performance as well as to production techniques.

RTV 360 - Digital Audio Production
Hours: 3
Digital Audio Production - Three Semester Hours Students will learn the fundamental skills required of sound engineers and/or producers working in the recording industry. Attention will be given to the basics of the mixing board, microphones and recording techniques for drums, bass, guitar, keyboards and vocals. Pre-requisites : RTV 221

RTV 380 - Sports Media
Hours: 3
Students will learn the basic aspects of live play-by-play broadcasting; color commentary; and sports reporting, anchoring and producing for radio, TV and online communications. Emphasis will be on practical experience in helping to produce sports programming for KETR, student radio KKOM and student television KETV. Prerequisites: RTV 215.

RTV 409 - Media Operations IV
Hours: 1
Supervised practice and instruction in radio-TV or other electronic media experiences including: radio announcing; radio production; television performance; television production; online video, visual, audio and/or textual production; and other activities related to the production of radio-TV programs and projects. Practicum is required in addition to the regular course of study. (2nd level, 3rd level, 4th level; May be repeated for credit.) Prerequisites: RTV 109.

RTV 420 - Multimedia Portfolio
Hours: 3
The course explores the Internet, particularly the World Wide Web, as it is used in mass communication, as a modern extension of media that have been traditionally associated with newspaper, television and radio station operations. Students will develop a greater appreciation for the history and implications of computer-mediated communication, explore cultural, social and economic issues of interactive media, and learn basic practical skills in interactive media production and management. Students will apply the skills learned in the class to their own media materials created from this and previous classes to create and publish an online portfolio related to the intended career interests. Prerequisites: RTV 322 or consent of instructor.

RTV 440 - Broadcast & Digital Journalism
Hours: 3
The course covers basic rules of broadcast news writing and visual storytelling, along with radio- and Internet-news creation and production and studio and newsroom procedures. Students will research, write, shoot and edit TV news stories and participate in producing a TV newscast.

RTV 453 - Social Media Marketing
Hours: 3
This theory-based course will examine concepts of communication, social interaction and community in a digital world. The course will include online social media applications and tools such as chat, blog, wiki, avatar, comment, podcast and similar Internet-based techniques of digital media communication. Students are expected to use social media practices to create multimedia learning journals, and will use social media to produce and present projects.

RTV 480 - Pro Seminar & Portfolio
Hours: 3
Professional Seminar & Portfolio - Three semester hours The course synthesizes content from previous courses in commercial broadcasting, investigates current trends and issues in broadcast and digital media production, and includes a thorough investigation of the job search process. Also, investigation of new trends in broadcast and digital media production, management, research, programming and government regulation. Prerequisite: at least 30 hours completed in RTV courses.

RTV 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head or RTV head.

RTV 490 - Honors Thesis
Hours: 1-6

RTV 491 - Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3

RTV 495 - Internship
Hours: 1-3
Internship - One, Two, or Three Semester Hours Students receive professional experience with radio, television or other electronic media, supervised both by a faculty member and an electronic-media professional. Students must have a GPA of not less than 2.6 in a minimum of three RTV courses, and the approval of the RTV division director before being approved for the internship.

RTV 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

RTV 1335 - US-Stud in Elec Comm
Hours: 3
(COMM 1335) Studies in Electronic Communications. Three semester hours. (1) A survey course to provide an understanding of the origin, operation, organization and history of broadcasting in the United States.

SPA 131 - GLB/Elementary Spanish I
Hours: 3
(SPAN 1311) Pronunciation, elements of grammar, vocabulary, and conversation and composition based on situations in everyday life. Emphasis on the spoken language. Introduction to Spanish culture.

SPA 132 - GLB/Elementary Spanish II
Hours: 3
(SPAN 1312) A continuation of SPA 131 with emphasis on reading and comprehension and on the spoken language. Prerequisite: SPA 131 or approved placement or CLEP or consent of department head.

SPA 231 - GLB/Intermediate Spanish I
Hours: 3
(SPAN 2311) Review of language fundamentals and continuation of conversation and composition. Emphasis on pronunciation, listening, and reading skills. Study of Hispanic civilization. Prerequisites: SPA 131 and 132 or consent of the department head.

SPA 232 - GLB/Intermediate Spanish II
Hours: 3
(SPAN 2312) Introduction to Spanish prose, poetry, or drama, or to Spanish essays on scientific and technical topics. Expansion of vocabulary and syntactical analysis. Further development of reading comprehension. Prerequisite: SPA 231 or consent of department head.

SPA 331 - Spanish Conversation, Language, and Culture Through Film
Hours: 3
In this course, which uses film as a primary teaching tool, culture takes a central role in the learning of oral language skills. The course, through relevant feature films from Spain and Latin America, motivates the learning of oral language skills, and at the same time fosters cultural awareness. Students are also exposed to linguistic variants in the Hispanic world. The course uses class discussions, filmic text interpretations, and creative writing to fine tune student´s oral skills and foster critical thinking, Prerequisites: SPA 232 or consent of the department head.

SPA 332 - Spanish Comp and Grammar
Hours: 3
Spanish Composition and Grammar. Three semester hours. Written communication through creative expression as well as essays, stressing situations that challenge students to think and speak more creatively in Spanish. Development of self-correction techniques. Prerequisite: SPA 232.

SPA 333 - GBL/Spa for Heritage Speakers
Hours: 3
This course is designed for heritage speakers of Spanish who demonstrate, by taking the Spanish Placement Exam, the CLEP exam or special permission from a Spanish faculty member (or a combination thereof), an ability to comprehend and produce Spanish but who lack previous formal instruction in the language. Capitalizes upon students' existing language skills, expands their knowledge base, and develops their ability to read, write and communicate more effectively in the language. Special attention is given to building vocabulary and strengthening composition skills in Spanish. Taught exclusively in Spanish, and for heritage or native speakers only. For students majoring or minoring in Spanish or bilingual education, this course replaces the SPA 331 requirement. Prerequisite: SPA 232 or equivalent by exam.

SPA 334 - SPANISH FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS
Hours: 3
Spanish for Heritage Speakers II. Three semester hours. A continuation of SPA 333, consisting of a detailed study of advanced Spanish grammar with emphasis on written expression. Capitalizes upon students' existing language skills, expands their knowledge base, and develops their ability to read, write and communicate more effectively in the language. Exclusively for heritage or native speakers of Spanish. For heritage or native speakers majoring or minoring in Spanish or bilingual education, this course replaces SPA 332. Prerequisite: SPA 333 or permission of instructor.

SPA 335 - Advanced Spanish for Teaching Certification
Hours: 3
Spanish 335 is an advanced Spanish course for students who need to improve their proficiency beyond the intermediate level and/or who plan to take the Texas State exams (LOTE / BLPT) to become a certified teacher in bilingual or Spanish education. The course fosters language proficiency through learning scenarios designed to reflect contemporary issues in the Spanish-speaking world and in the bilingual and Spanish classroom. Special attention to developing oral and writing skills for the Texas State exams. Prerequisites: SPA331 & SPA 332 OR SPA333&SPA334, or permission of advisor.

SPA 341 - Intro to Spanish Literature
Hours: 3
Introduction to Spanish Literature. Three semester hours. An introduction to four genres of Spanish literature: poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction prose. The course is designed to develop discriminating reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPA 332 or 334 or permission of instructor.

SPA 342 - GLB/ Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Hours: 3
Introduction to the main topics within the field of Hispanic Linguistics. The course examines the areas of Spanish phonetics and phonology, morphology and syntax, semantics, linguistic change and variation, and Spanish spoken in the United States. Prerequisites: SPA 331/332 OR SPA 333/334 (minimum grade C-).

SPA 353 - Spanish Culture & Civil
Hours: 3
Spanish Culture and Civilization. Three semester hours. Explores the history, politics, social structures and traditions of Spain from the XII Century until today. Special emphasis on contemporary life in Spain and the relations with the Americas and the European Market. Prerequisite: SPA 232.

SPA 354 - GLB/Latin Am Culture & Civil
Hours: 3
Latin American Culture and Civilization. Three semester hours. Explores the history, politics, social structures and traditions of Latin America. Begins with the pre-Columbian civilizations and continues through independence movements and the Latin America of today. Prerequisite: SPA 232.

SPA 415 - Spanish Amer Lit
Hours: 3

SPA 428 - Span Amer Novel
Hours: 3

SPA 471 - GLB/SPA: Topics in Latin American Comparative Cultural Studies
Hours: 3
A study of Latin American various cultural discourses that encompasses film, literature, philosophy, art, dance, music and other cultural representations from a global and theoretical perspective. The class intersects these and others discourses in dialog with various lines of thought from around the world. May be repeated for credit when the emphasis changes. Prerequisites: SPA 341 or permission of instructor.

SPA 472 - GLB/Issues in Spanish Literature and Culture
Hours: 3
This course concentrates on essential questions, concepts, and themes (issues of gender, politics, religion, art, etc.) that determine and define the construction of culture throughout Spanish history. The course highlights specific works of literature, film, and other texts, in order to offer the necessary depth for students to produce research of their own interest. Through the study of critical and theoretical terms, and the reading and interpretation of a variety of texts pertaining to a range of art expressions, students will acquire analytic and interpretive tools to draw their own conclusions related to the world in which they live. Among the topics that may be covered by this course are: the construction of gender, social power relations, the relation between art production and Prerequisites: SPA 341 or permission of instructor.

SPA 475 - Methods for Teaching Spa
Hours: 3
Methods for Teaching Spanish as a Second Language - Three semester hours This course is a practical introduction to second language acquisition theories, and familiarizes students with different methodologies specifically for the instruction of Spanish as a second language. Beginning with an overview of traditional and current foreign language teaching methods, the course focuses on current pedagogical trends. This class presents a number of techniques designed to develop students’ skills pursuant to language and learning theories, learning objectives, and the role of teachers and students. Students are made familiar with the components of effective teaching tools such as lesson planning, student needs analysis, class materials, and tools for assessment. A large part of the course consists of hands-on activities, discussions, and practical applications to promote meaningful and active learning. Pre-requisites : SPA 232

SPA 483 - Professional Writing in Spanish
Hours: 3
Development of advanced writing skills in Spanish; intense practice of strategies and techniques for the production of Spanish texts. The course prepares students to successfully deal with academic and professional writing in Spanish through preparation, production and edition of diverse discourse genres. Prerequisites: SPA 331 & 332 OR SPA 333 & 334 (minimum grade C-).

SPA 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

SPA 490 - Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis. Three semester hours.

SPA 491 - H Independent Honors Rdgs
Hours: 3
Individual Honors Readings. Three semester hours.

SPA 495 - Internship
Hours: 3
Internship. Three credit hours. Approved work experience in a professional organization. Supervision under the guidance of a practicing professional and departmental faculty member. Prerequisite: Junior standing and approval of the department head. May be repeated once when the internship organization changes.

SPA 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of the department head.

Tabetha Adkins
Associate Professor and Dean, University College
B.A., Marshall University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Louisville

Salvatore Attardo
Professor and Dean of the College of Humanities, Social Sciences and Arts
Ph.D., Purdue University.

John Ballotti
Senior Lecturer
B.S., M.A., University of Wyoming; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Flavia L. Belpoliti
Assistant Professor
B.A., USAL University, M.S., Universidadad de Buenos Aires, Ph.D., University of Houston.

William Bolin
Associate Professor
B.A., Southwest Texas State University; M.A., Texas AM University, Kingsville; Ph.D., Texas Christian University.

Lamar W. Bridges
Professor
B.S., Memphis State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Southern Illinois University.

Shannon Carter
Professor
B.A., Texas AM University-Corpus Christi; M.Ed., University of North Texas; Ph.D., Texas Woman’s University.

Dongmei Cheng
Assistant Professor
B.A., Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, China; M.A., Winona State University; Ph.D., Northern Arizona University

Tony DeMars
Professor
B.S., Texas A&M - Texarkana; M.A., Stephen F. Austin State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi

John Mark Dempsey
Associate Professor
B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Gerald Duchovnay
Professor
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University.

Donna L. Dunbar-Odom
Professor and Director of Liberal Studies
B.G.S., M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh.

Maria Fernandez-Lamarque
Associate Professor
B.S., I.G.V. University; M.A., Lousiana State University; Ph.D., Tulane University

Stephen Furlich
Assistant Professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University

Christian Hempelmann
Assistant Professor
M.A., Youngstown State University; Ph.D., Purdue University

Kathryn Jacobs
Professor
B.A., M.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University.

Inmaculada Cívico Lyons
Associate Professor
B.A., University of Seville; M.A., Texas AM University-Commerce; Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin.

Jessica Pauszek
Assistant Professor and Director of Writing
B.A., Stetson University; M.A., Northeasterm University; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Lucy Pickering
Associate Professor
B.A., West Sussex Institute of Higher Education; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida.

Robin A Reid
Professor
B.A., M.A., Western Washington University; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of Washington.
Texas A&M University System Graduate Faculty Member.

Karen Roggenkamp
Professor and Assistant Department Head
B.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Fred R. Stewart
Instructor
B.A., University of Texas at Tyler; M.A., Morehead State University.

Susan Louise Stewart
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., Southwest Missouri State University; Ph.D., Illinois State University.