History

Sharon A. Kowalsky (Department Head)
Location: Ferguson Social Sciences Building, Room 111, 903-886-5226
Department Head: Sharon Kowalsky, Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu
Graduate Studies Advisor: Andrew Baker, Andrew.Baker@tamuc.edu
Undergraduate Advisor: Derrick McKisick, Derrick.McKisick@tamuc.edu
History Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/humanitiesSocialSciencesArts/departments/history/default.aspx

The Department of History offers the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, and Master of Science degrees. The baccalaureate degrees may be taken with teacher certification. The objectives of the history department are to acquaint students with the human past, give insight into the nature of the historic process, and prepare them for responsible democratic citizenship. In addition, students improve their ability to analyze and think critically about historical works and issues, as well as to express their judgments clearly in writing.

Recognizing that the mastery of the subject of history is a lifelong pursuit, the department has designed a program that includes a core of common courses for all students and a range of courses in selected areas from which students may choose. All majors and second majors in history are expected to complete survey courses in U.S. and World History as well as a workshop course that focuses on historical methodology and an upper division Themes in World History course. Students then may choose a stipulated number of courses in the areas of American, European, Asian, and Latin American history.

Students may use their Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor Science degrees in history as preparation for a variety of careers, in addition to teaching. Museum and archival work, government service, law, politics, publishing, genealogical services, and public relations are just a few of the fields in which historians may make careers.

While there is not agreed upon “core curriculum” in history in which one may demonstrate competency in a single exam, students will demonstrate their competency in critical thinking, analysis, writing skills, and the articulation of ideas by satisfactorily completing the requirements of each course. First or second majors who are enrolled in the teacher education program must pass a “TExES” exam, designed by the Texas Education Agency, before they may be certified as teachers.  Student in the teacher preparation programs must have a G.P.A. of at least 3.0 in their major to be approved for student teaching.

For information about graduate programs, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree must complete:

  1. degree requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Students who elect to take a Bachelor of Arts degree must complete four courses (12 hours) in the same foreign language. Doing so requires selecting as electives four courses in a foreign language. Foreign language credit is not required for the Bachelor of Science degree; however, in view of the increasingly multicultural composition of this state’s population, the department encourages future teachers to fulfill the language requirements of the Bachelor of Arts degree.

ALIB 464 - Archives Administration
Hours: 3
This course provides students with an introduction and hands-on instruction to the theories, methods, and processes used to manage archives, manuscripts, and digital resources related to libraries. Prerequisites: HIST. 462: Introduction to Public History. Crosslisted with: ALIB 564.

HIST 1301 - History of the United States through Reconstruction
Hours: 3
A broad interdisciplinary course in the historical development of the United States and North America to 1877. Assignments will focus on reading, writing, and analysis. Prerequisites: ENG 1301 or concurrent enrollment or ENG 1302 or concurrent enrollment.

HIST 1302 - History of the United States From Reconstruction
Hours: 3
A broad interdisciplinary course in the historical development of the United States and North America from 1865. Note: Assignments will focus on reading, writing, and analysis. Prerequisites: ENG 1301 or concurrent enrollment or ENG 1302 or concurrent enrollment.

HIST 189 - Independent Study-Lower Level Undergraduate
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an lower-level undergraduate in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

HIST 264 - A Nation Divided: American History
Hours: 3
The United States is a country characterized by diversity. Its history is the story of interactions between groups divided by race, ethnicity, language, income, religion, ideology, culture, and gender. This course explores the nature of encounters between social groups and the consequences such encounters had for American culture and politics. Topics such as Native American history, the Civil Rights Movement, and the labor movement may receive special attention. The course satisfies a Literature, Philosophy and Culture requirement for the core curriculum and may be repeated when topics change.

HIST 265 - GLB/A World Divided: Global History
Hours: 3
Encounters between human populations who perceive the differences that separate them to be greater than the similarities that unite them have punctuated world history. Such encounters have frequently led to war, imperialism and colonization, and less frequently to cultural imitation and syncretism. The modern world is the product of these encounters as much as, if not more than, it is the product of the development of district regional cultures, such as Western Civilization. This course explores the nature of such encounters and the consequences they had for cultural and political developments. The course satisfies a Literature, Philosophy and Culture requirement for the core curriculum and may be repeated when topics change.

HIST 303 - GLB/Historical Geography
Hours: 3
A study of the various ways in which history has affected and has been affected by geography, including but not limited to physical, political, cultural, and environmental elements. Topics may include the emergence of ancient civilizations, the spread of Islam, and global commercial relations. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 305 - GLB/World History to 17th Century
Hours: 3
World History differs from traditional Western Civilization not only in its greater geographic scale but also its longer chronological scope. This course begins with the earliest human tribal organizations. Consideration of the ancient period will also include the development of cradles of civilization, the growth and decline of classical cultures, interactions among classical and nomadic peoples, and the establishment of great world religions. The study of the medieval period will include varieties of rebuilding after the collapse of classical empires, the roles played by great world religions in medieval cultures, and the development of technologies of communication and transportation. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 306 - GLB/The Modern World
Hours: 3
This course covers the period from 1500 to the present and will focus on the ecological conditions of globalization, the rise of "formal" imperialism, and the construction and maintenance of colonial/imperial states. Themes covered will included paths to modernity, non-western philosophies of resistance, technological revolutions, and the intersections of world thought, religion, trade, and economy. Special emphasis will be given to the non-Western world. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 311 - Modern East Asia
Hours: 3
This course is a survey of developments in China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam during the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on the impact of the West in the 19th century and modernization in the 20th. It considers the impact of domestic and global conditions on East Asian history as a means of understanding regional and national events in an international context. This course will examine in detail the growth and effects of nationalism in East Asia and specific emphasis will be placed on comparing the efforts by China and Japan to modernize in response to ongoing Western encroachment, and then consider the challenges faced by these countries in the post-war world. Prerequisites: Non-Majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 316 - Modern India
Hours: 3
This course surveys the history of the Indian subcontinent from c.1700. It considers trends and themes in Indian history, emphasizing British colonial rule and India's transition to an independent state. The effects of Mughal decline and the advent of British conquest will be explored, as will the nature of British colonial rule. A significant focus will be the evolution of the Indian nation-state and the characteristics of India's anti-imperialist movement. This introduction to historic trends will prepare students to understand the long-term significance and implications of past events and their relevance to issues in today’s India and Pakistan. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 317 - Modern Middle East
Hours: 3
This course focuses on the modern Middle East and this region’s complex relationship with the rest of the world. Subjects may include modernization, industrialization, globalization, foreign policy, decolonization, minority politics, gender and sexuality, social and religious reform movements, and local and international politics. Students will learn how this core region of the Islamic world influenced and was (is) influenced by colonialism and imperialism. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 325 - Colonial Latin America
Hours: 3
This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America from the late pre-Columbian period through the initial movements for Independence. it will highlight the Amerindian, African and European experiences in the colonization process as well as the colonial structures. Topics include Christianization, race and gender relations, political and economic systems, and the rise of Creole nationalism. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 327 - Latin America in the Modern Period
Hours: 3
This course will examine Latin America since the independence process. It will study the obstacles confronted by the new nations, as well as themes such as the role of women in society, political violence and resistance, as well as the deepening links between Latin America and the world economy and its relationship with the United States. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 332 - Ancient and Medieval Europe
Hours: 3
This course begins with a consideration of classical Greece and Rome, continues into the Late Antique period when classical culture gave way to medieval and then through the European Middle Ages, ending about 1500. Continuity and change between the classical and post-classical periods will be examined from a variety of perspectives, including the fortunes of political, social, economic, and religious institutions; the forms and varieties of social organizations; the models and content of philosophy, literature, and the arts; and technology. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 337 - Europe in the Age of Enlightenment and Revolution, 1648-1848
Hours: 3
This courses will explore European history from the Age of Louis XIV to the mid-nineteenth-century revolutions, tracing the changes in ideas about politics, governance, and society as they evolved from theories of divine rule to the realities of mass politics. Particular attention will be paid to the phenomena of absolutism and enlightened despotism, the general transformation of intellectual thought known as the Enlightenment, and the events leading up to the French Revolution. Finally, the course will trace the impact of the French Revolution on European society, culture, and politics, highlighting the developments that made mass political participation possible. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 338 - Modern Europe, 1848-1991
Hours: 3
This course investigates the momentous events of the late 19th and 20th centuries in Europe and the impact of these developments on the rest of the world. Over the course of the semester, students will explore the formation of European nations, states, and empires; the emergence of ideologies such as nationalism, socialism, communism, and fascism; the impact of technological developments; and the devastation of the wars and genocides that have shaped the modern period. The course, framed by the upheavals of 1848 and 1991, gives special attention to the role of revolution, protest, and mass movements in Modern Europe, and the important contributions of Eastern Europe (including Russia). Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 342 - Colonial North America to 1763
Hours: 3
This course explores the history and cultures of American Indians, Europeans, Africans, and African Americans in North America, and the formation of an Atlantic World from the Precontact Period through the Peace of Paris ending the Seven Years' War. Topics covered include the conflict and cooperation between natives and newcomers, the role of religion in the conquest and settlement of the continent, the economic and political development of British America, the pivotal role of slavery, and the evolving social structures of colonial communities. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 343 - Revolutionary America, 1763-1789
Hours: 3
This course examines the rise, progress and ramifications of the American Revolution that created the United States of America, from its beginnings in the 1760s through the War for Independence, the creation of a national government, and the ratification of the Constitution. Topics covered include the social, economic, and political maturation of the British Atlantic World, the roles played by women, American Indians, and African Americans, as well as the role of religion throughout the period. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 344 - Early National United States, 1789-1850
Hours: 3
This course examines the development of the United States from the ratification of the Constitution through the contentious debate over slavery dividing the nation. Topics covered include the triumph of democratic-republicanism over federalism, and the unique culture of radical democracy, which incorporated a strong religious component. Highlights include the War of 1812, the Second Great Awakening, social reform movements, Indian Removal, and westward expansion. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 345 - Civil War and Reconstruction
Hours: 3
This course charts national debate over slavery from the early Republic through secession, addressing topics concerning the conduct and outcome of the war, and discussing the legacy of the conflict in American history with special attention to the period of Reconstruction. The course strikes a balance between military, political, economic, racial, and gender issues in understanding the period. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 346 - Modern United States 1850-1920
Hours: 3
This course examines the final crisis between the sections over the issue of slavery which produced Civil War, slavery's destruction, and opened a long tortured effort to fully define citizenship for those freed from slavery's grasp. Industrialization and its complications brought political radicalism and demands for reform. Economic growth helped fuel expansion overseas greater involvement in the international affairs, and involvement in the First World War. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 347 - The Twentieth-Century United States
Hours: 3
The cataclysm of World War I produced international economic catastrophe, masked initially in America by an emerging consumer economy and the Jazz Age. Economic depression produced a climate in which the government became the insurer of general prosperity. World War II ended the Great Depression, produced the modern middle-class but also began a period of prolonged international competition with the Soviet Union. Despite prevailing over communism, the United States closed the century facing international uncertainty and economic limits. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 400 - Teaching and Learning in History and Social Studies
Hours: 3
This course explores historical thinking and learning in the social studies. It is designed to prepare history/social studies teachers for service in 4-12 and/or early college classrooms. Students will write, revise, and implement curriculum plans, lesson plans, and teaching methods in a seminar setting. Students will compile a teaching and learning capstone project for the course. Prerequisites: Students may only enroll with consent of the department undergraduate advisor.

HIST 408 - GLB/Themes in World History
Hours: 3
This course is a study of the themes which influenced all human cultures from the earliest times to the present, considered within the context of a comparative framework. Such themes as the impact of technological change on society, the development of means of economic exchange and the structure of religious and ideological systems will be examined. May be repeated for credit up to nine semester hours as topics change. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 412 - Mapping Our World: An Introduction to Cartography
Hours: 3
In this course, students will learn the ways in which humanity has tried to comprehend the world in which we live by cartographic documentation. Topics may include maps of antiquity, the techniques of the Ancient Greek philosophers, efforts to chart the globe during the Ages of Discovery, the digital world of twenty-first-century satellite mapping and geo-referencing, and the intersections of history and cartography. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 413 - GLB/Food in World History
Hours: 3
This course examines the role of food in shaping world history from ancient times through the modern era. Focused attention is given to crucial transitions in food history such as the agricultural revolution, the Columbian Exchange, and globalization. Using the lens of food history and culinary cultures, this course will examine the connections and exchanges within historical events and related issues such as empire, migration, race, class, gender, religion, power, identity, and the environment. This course can be applied toward the Food Studies minor. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with permission of department.

HIST 414 - GLB/Global Enviro History
Hours: 3
This course explores the historical relationship between human communities and their environmental settings. Spanning early societies to the present, the course will examine case studies around the globe to illustrate how the natural environment has conditioned historical change, and how important historical transitions have shaped the natural world. Topics may include the environmental contexts of early development of thought and religion, demographic change, the Industrial Revolution, modern science and technology, and conservation movements. Because global environmental history is a relatively new domain of historical inquiry, an important goal of the course is to encourage students to appreciate the existence and potential value of multiple points of view in historical discourse. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with permission of the department.

HIST 417 - History of the Ottoman Empire
Hours: 3
This course covers the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the Ottoman Empire. It traces the empire’s history from its inception to the height of its power, and then to its dissolution in the twentieth century. The course will provide students with a survey of the history of the Ottoman empire, state, and society. The course showcases the diversity within the Ottoman Empire and its connections with neighboring empires and the world at large. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 418 - Themes in Asian or Middle East History
Hours: 3
A study of themes influencing historical developments in the region of Asia or the Middle East. This course may touch on any time period or geographical region within Asia or the Middle East, broadly construed. Course may be repeated once for credit as topic changes. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 428 - History of Modern Mexico
Hours: 3
This course examines the development of the Mexican nation-state from the beginnings of independence through the twenty-first century. Themes may include war and conflict, authoritarianism and liberalism, U.S.-Mexico relations, race, gender, revolution, society, and popular culture. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 433 - A Feudal Society
Hours: 3
This course examines European society during the period roughly from 500 to 1500. The focus will be on how different groups of people experienced life during the Middle Ages. Topics will include the three estates and those on their margins; economic and occupational organizations; and gender and family roles. The course will also study how medieval people understood their own society, that is, how medieval beliefs, particularly religious beliefs, informed how medieval people interpreted their world. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 434 - The European Reformations
Hours: 3
This course examines how Christian beliefs, institutions, and practices altered in Europe from the late fourteenth through the mid-seventeenth centuries. The course will begin with a consideration of theologians and the theology, both from the late middle ages, such as John Wycliffe, and the sixteenth century, such as Martin Luther. It will analyze the institutional cultural, and political ramifications of religious beliefs, including the formation of new Christian churches; the alliances formed between churches and national governments; and the changes in attitudes towards women and the poor, manifested in episodes such as the witch craze. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 436 - Russia and the Soviet Union from Peter to Putin
Hours: 3
This course will provide an examination of the history of Russia and the Soviet Union from the reign of Peter the Great to Vladimir Putin. Providing an overview of the period, the course will focus on issues such as the emergence of the Russian and Soviet Empires, the relationship of Russia and the Soviet Union to the world, the nature of autocratic and totalitarian regimes and resistance to them, state and social transformation through reform and revolution, and the lived experiences of workers, peasants, women, and minority groups in Russia. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 440 - Modern Civil Rights Movements
Hours: 3
This course examines and explores the development of modern Civil Rights Movements from the end of the nineteenth century through the twenty-first century. The struggle for equality in the United States has taken many forms, affected every citizen of the United States, and provided different ways to understand the true meaning of freedom and liberty. Topics covered in the course may include: Reconstruction, Jim Crow America, Progressivism, New Deal policies, WWII, the Great Society and War on Poverty, Black Power, Affirmative Action, and Reverse Discrimination. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 443 - History of the American West
Hours: 3
This course provides an overview of different regions, cultures, peoples, and ideas that have been used to define the American West. As one of the most culturally, ethnically, and geographically diverse regions of the United States, the West encompasses many different concepts of what it means to be an American. During the semester, we will examine why the West continues to be an important symbol of independence, distinctiveness, and freedom. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 445 - Advanced Studies in Texas History
Hours: 3
A topical examination of Texas history, this course covers material from the time of Spanish colonization to the present day. The state's diversity and development take center stage, and the state's history is placed in the context of national and global trends. This course examines political, economic racial, ethnic gender, and social issues in Texas history. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 450 - African American History
Hours: 3
This course surveys the development of African American history from the end of the nineteenth century through the present. The course provides students with an overview of the wide variety of historical moments, people, and concepts that have shaped the memory, responses, and lives of African Americans. Topics covered in this course may include Antebellum slavery, Civil War and Reconstruction, Gilded Age, Populism, Great Migration, World War I, Harlem Renaissance, Great Depression, World War II, Modern Civil Rights Movements, Black Power, Massive Resistance, post-Civil Rights, and the rise of Barack Obama. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 457 - Themes in United States History
Hours: 3
A study of themes which influenced all human history in what is now the United States ranging from pre-Columbian periods to the present, considered within the context of a comparative framework. Such themes as the impact of technological change on society, enfranchisement and civil rights, the development of means of economic exchange and the structure of religious and ideological systems may be examined. May be repeated as topic changes. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 462 - Introduction to Public History
Hours: 3
This course introduces the field of Public History by examining topics that range from historical methods and interpretation, historical analysis, public interactions, and controversies associated with the practice of public history. Crosslisted with: HIST 564.

HIST 466 - Oral History Theory and Methods
Hours: 3
This course introduces the theory and practice of oral history. Students will engage with the central theoretical issues of the field, including the construction of memory, narrative, subjectivity, and structures of social power. Prerequisites: HIST. 462: Introduction to Public History. Crosslisted with: HIST 566.

HIST 467 - Public History Internship
Hours: 3
This internship and capstone project is designed as a significant demonstration of the student’s ability to combine theory and practice in a project that has to be approved by and under the supervision of the certificate program Director. To register for the internship, the student must complete both HIST 462 and a project proposal. Prerequisites: HIST. 462: Introduction to Public History and satisfactory submission of a project proposal. Crosslisted with: HIST 567.

HIST 473 - Women and Gender in European History
Hours: 3
This course explores European women's and men's changing social roles and competing views of femininity and masculinity in European history. It examines the status and role of women as well as the cultural construction of myths of gender and sexuality. Special attention will be paid to questions of equality and difference, the relationship between gender and politics/power, and issues of the female body, sexuality, and the family. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 479 - Women, Gender, and Sexuality in United States History
Hours: 3
This course explores the study of women, gender and sexuality in the United States with primary focus from the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. The goal of this course is to encourage the analysis and discussion of the social, political, and economic meanings of gender in the United States by examining the experiences of women and men from a variety of cultural vantage points using both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

HIST 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of the department.

HIST 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Students may enroll with consent of Honor's College advisor. May be repeated when the topic changes.

HIST 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Students may enroll with consent of Honor's College advisor. May be repeated when the topic changes.

HIST 492 - Senior Research Seminar
Hours: 3
This course affords an opportunity for senior history majors to conduct original historical research. Students will demonstrate the skills necessary for properly conducting historical research through classroom discussion and activities, out-of-classroom assignments and independent research work. Students will: engage in a discussion of the discipline of history; explain how historiography and sources can be used to frame historical arguments; recognize the contested nature of historical evidence and the value of scholarly debate; and demonstrate information retrieval skills required for historical research. The guided preparation of an approved scholarly research paper is designed to produce work that can be presented at a history conference or, submitted for publication. Prerequisites: Students may enroll only with consent of the History Department undergraduate advisor.

HIST 497 - Special Topics in History
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary. Prerequisites: Non-majors may enroll with consent of department.

Jessica Brannon-Wranosky
Distinguished Professor of Digital Humanities and History
B.A., M.A., Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi; Ph.D., University of North Texas

Mylynka Cardona
Assistant Professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington

Ricky Floyd Dobbs
Associate Provost, Academic Foundations
B.A., M.A., Baylor University; Ph.D., Texas AM University.

Judy Ford
Professor
B.A., St. John’s University; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University.

Sanja Kadric
Assistant Professor
B.A., Seattle University; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Sharon A. Kowalsky
Associate Professor, Department Head, and Director of Gender Studies
B.A., Washington University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina.

William F. Kuracina
Professor and Dean CHSSA
B.S., Clarkson University; M.A., State University College at Buffalo; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Derrick D. McKisick
Associate Professor
B.A. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, M.A., Ph.D. University of Arkansas

E. Mark Moreno
Assistant Professor
B.S., Montana State University; M.S., San Diego State University;Ph.D., Boston University

Robert Nelson
Assistasnt Professional Track
B.A., Texas A&M-College Station; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Texas

Cynthia Ross
Assistant Professor
B.A., University of Nevada; M.A., Ph.D., Washington State University

John H. Smith
Professor
B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Albany.