School of Agriculture

Randy M Harp (Director)
Location: Ag Building, Room 135, 903.886.5358
School of Agriculture Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/ag

The School of Agriculture offers degrees at both the baccalaureate and master’s levels. A Bachelor of Science degree can be earned in several different majors, as described below.  

Majors in the School of Agriculture

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in any of the following majors must complete:

  1. general requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree, and
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to those sections of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Pre-Professional Program for Veterinary Medicine

The School of Agriculture also offers an undergraduate pre-professional program in pre-veterinary medicine. Students are advised to follow the pre-professional curriculum as well as pursue a degree in Animal Science. Students selecting the pre-veterinary program will be trained in biological, animal, chemical and physical sciences. For additional information, contact the pre-veterinary advisor, Dr. Douglas Eborn at 903.886.5676, Douglas.Eborn@tamuc.edu or Dr. Gregory Eckerle at 903.886.5717, Gregory.Eckerle@tamuc.edu.

Teacher Education Programs

Students interested in becoming a middle or high school teacher of Agricultural Science and Technology should contact Dr. Bob Williams (903-886-5350), the faculty advisor for specific information and appropriate course selection.

Minors in the School of Agriculture

AEC 219 - Agricultural Economics
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2317) A study of economic principles, with emphasis on their application to the solution of farm, agribusiness, and agricultural industry problems.

AEC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

AEC 314 - Farm Management
Hours: 3
Farm Management. Three semester hours. Techniques and procedures used for decision making in the farm business. Determination of optimum enterprise choice, resource combination and techniques of financial management, budgeting, and whole farm/ranch planning.

AEC 316 - Agricultural Marketing
Hours: 3
Agricultural Marketing. Three semester hours. A broad view of marketing; food markets and consumption; marketing functions and institutions. Applications of economic theory to agricultural price estimation, discovery, and determination.

AEC 340 - Agricultural Finance
Hours: 3
Agricultural Finance. Three semester hours. Analysis of capital investments, interpretation of financial statements, capital structure considerations for agricultural firms, farm real estate pricing, and financial intermediation in agriculture.

AEC 347 - Agricultural Price Theory
Hours: 3
Intermediate microeconomic principles with agricultural commodity applications related to market price determination, resource allocations, and government policies.

AEC 360 - Agricultural Law
Hours: 3
Agricultural Law. Three semester hours. Survey of law and legal decisions that impact agriculture including farm and preservation, water rights, pollution abatement standards, workers' rights, externalities, pesticide/insecticide regulation, product inspection, development of legislation, mineral rights and employer liability. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AEC 380 - Agricultural Statistics
Hours: 3
Agricultural Statistics - Three semester hours Principles and estimation techniques used in the analysis of agricultural data including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, sampling, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation coefficient, and regression. Pre-requisites : Math 141 or Math 175 or Higher Math

AEC 435 - GLB/Agricultural Policy I
Hours: 3
Analytical treatment of historical, recent and current economic problems, and governmental policies influencing American agriculture and rural America. The focus is on developing an historical and conceptual understanding of the economics of agriculture and how public policy has and does influence the nature and performance of American agriculture.

AEC 445 - Natural Resource and Environmental Economics
Hours: 3
This course explores the approach that economists take to environmental and resource problems. It examines both the economic roots of environmental problems and the solutions that economists suggest. The course focuses on questions a policymaker must face in deciding how and when to regulate, including issues of efficiency and distribution.

AEC 455 - Commodity Futures and Options
Hours: 3
The objectives of this course are to understand why futures exchanges and commodity futures contracts exist; understand and be able to forecast basis; understand hedging and be able to design hedging strategies for various commodity producers and users; understand both put and call options and their potential use in a commodity risk management program; and understand the usefulness and shortcomings of fundamental and technical analysis.

AEC 489 - Indst Ag Economics
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AEC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 100 - Intro To Agriculture
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1131) Introduction to agriculture and its relationship to the sciences. Also explores careers and opportunities in agriculture. Insights into the agriculture curriculum and course content are also presented. Required of all agriculture majors.

AG 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4

AG 300 - Professional Agricultural Communications
Hours: 1
Professional Agricultural Communications. One semester hour. Techniques of agricultural communication emphasizing principles involved in job search. Techniques of interviewing, resume writing, letters of inquiry, etc. For agriculture majors. Prerequisites: ENG 1301 and junior standing.

AG 335 - Wildlife Management I
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management I. Three semester hours. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the many aspects of wildlife and conservation science. It will provide an introduction to the history of wildlife management and conservation, ecosystems and ecology, population modeling, animal behavior, food and cover, wildlife diseases, predators and predation, and hunting and trapping. Offered: FALL

AG 336 - Wildlife Management II
Hours: 3
Wildlife Management II. Three semester hours. This course is designed to complement Wildlife Management I and provides an introduction to the many aspects of wildlife ecology and conservation science. Topics covered include water and soils, farmlands, rangelands, and forests, parks and refuges, urban wildlife management, and non-game and endangered species. Students are required to participate in field trips designed to give practical experience in wildlife management techniques.

AG 392 - GLB/Appld Ethics US World Ag
Hours: 3
This course examines major, contemporary issues in agriculture and food policy with emphasis on the ethical aspects of each issue. Discussion focuses on assessing the particular economic, cultural, geographic, political, religious, technological and scientific principles with a moral and ethical framework. Course scope is approximately half U.S. domestic issues and half international issues. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

AG 397 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AG 400 - Seminar
Hours: 1
Seminar. One semester hour. Techniques involved in presenting scientific and technical oral reports. Oral presentations required. Prerequisites: Senior standing.

AG 405 - Internship Agri-Industris
Hours: 3-6
Internship in Agri-Industries. Three to six semester hours. This course provides the opportunity for students to gain on-the-job experience in the preparation for careers in the rapidly growing agri-related areas of industry and business. Assignments will be at an approved work situation under supervision of a designated faculty member. Ten to twenty hours per week will be required.

AG 407 - General Biochemistry
Hours: 3
General Biochemistry - Three semester hours Nomenclature, structure, and function of major biomolecules and study of life processes involving them. Topics include enzymology, metabolism, molecular genetics, and biosynthesis. Treatment is qualitative, with very few quantitative considerations. Whenever appropriate, biochemistry is related to biological and health issues. Prerequisite BSC 1406, 1407; and Chem 212; or consent of the instructor. Note: For majors in life sciences and students interested in health professions such as veterinary medicine, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, and dentistry.

AG 408 - Nutritional Biochemistry
Hours: 3
Nutritional Biochemistry - Three semester hours A course in biochemistry using nutrition as a model. Topics will include the energetics of metabolism, the structure and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and the integration of metabolic systems. Included also will be the chemistry of nitrogenous bases and how transcription and translation is accomplished on the cellular level. The course is 3-credit-hour class with 3 hours lecture and no lab (3,0). Prerequisites are ANS 407, CHEM 212, CHEM 314.

AG 489 - Indst Agricul Sci
Hours: 3
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AG 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 0-6
AG 490 - H Honors Thesis Hours: 6 Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite Consent of head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

AG 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
AG 491 - H IND HONORS RDGS Hours: 3 Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite Consent of head. Note May be repeated when the topic varies.

AG 495 - Ungd Research in the Ag Scienc
Hours: 3
Undergraduate Research in the Agricultural Sciences. Three semester hours. Undergraduate research for those students pursuing a bachelors degree in the agricultural sciences. May not be taken if an honors thesis is being completed. Prerequisites: Junior status and a 2.7 cumulative grade point average with a 3.0 major grade point average. Must have prior acceptance by a faculty member in the agricultural sciences.

AG 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-5
Special Topics. One to five semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

AGED 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

AGED 371 - Agricultural & Youth Leadershi
Hours: 3
Agricultural and Youth Leadership. Three semester hours. Application of leadership principles with emphasis on interpersonal and personal skills, organizational structure, and FFA and 4-H Club activities.

AGED 404 - Supervised Experience Programs
Hours: 3
Supervised Experience Programs - Three semester hours Theories and practices associated with experiential learning models used in secondary agricultural science programs and community-based youth programs.

AGED 465 - Student Tch Secondary Sch
Hours: 6
Student Teaching in the Secondary School. Six semester hours. (2) The student will teach in a selected school for a continuous period of 14 weeks under the joint supervision of local school officials and personnel of the University. The student teacher will engage in and develop, as nearly as possible, all professional competencies deemed essential in teaching an Agricultural Science and Technology program. Senior standing required. Prerequisite: SED 300, PSY 300

AGED 470 - Meth Tchg Ag Sci/Tech
Hours: 3
Methods of Teaching Agricultural Science and Technology. Three semester hours. (3 lecture, 0 lab) (2) Professional skills deemed appropriate to and essential in the teaching of all phases of a local program of Agricultural Science and Technology will be developed. This course is taken during the student teaching residency semester. Senior standing required. Prerequisites: AGED 371

AGED 471 - The Prog Instr Ag Sci/Tech
Hours: 3
The Program of Instruction in Agricultural Science and Technology. Three semester hours. A "Comprehensive Program of Instruction" will be planned for each student, including courses of study for the secondary school, programs of activities for th FFA, resource use and parent/community relations. Philosophy and administration of secondary and community-based Agricultural Science and Technology programs will be emphasized. This course is taken during the student teaching residency semester. Senior standing required. Prerequisites: SED 300.

AGED 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-6

AGED 497 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-4

AMC 215 - Agricultural Welding Techniques
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2303) Introduction to oxy-fuel cutting/welding, shielded metal arc welding, and gas metal arc welding processes in context of applications in agricultural equipment repair and fabrication.

AMC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

AMC 315 - Agri Systms Technology Mgmt
Hours: 3
Agricultural Systems Technology Management. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Preliminary study to acquaint student professionals with the principles and theories needed to comprehend and manage agricultural and environmental technology; introduce the application of information technology to agricultural and environment systems; develop mathematical concepts and unit analysis skills associated with machinery and equipment, industry and marketing, energy, structural and environmental and natural resource systems. Focus shall be on basic knowledge rather than on in-depth analysis of the systems covered. Prerequisites: Math 141 or consent of the instructor.

AMC 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics - 1-4 Semester Hours

AMC 423 - Natural Resources Management
Hours: 3
An investigation of best management practices and conservation techniques used by land owners and managers to protect renewable natural resources from intensive agricultural production methods. Emphasis will be on preventing soil loss and contamination, maintaining water quality, and protecting wildlife habitat. Prerequisites: Junior standing or instructor approval.

AMC 424 - Agricultural Safety
Hours: 3
Principles and strategies for implementing safety training and reducing risk of injuries in agricultural enterprises including shop and machinery operations, chemical applications, livestock handling, transportation, and farm-based recreation. Prerequisites: Junior or instructor approval.

AMC 425 - Agri Structures
Hours: 3
Agricultural Structures and Material Handling Systems. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab) A study of the principles and theories needed to comprehend and manage agricultural environmental technology associated with structural systems. Reduction and synthesis of natural and applied science principles which involve structural materials and their selection; heating, ventilation, and cooling of structures; processing and handling of biological materials; and knowledge of entrepreneurship, client relations, communications, economics, safety, service, planning, and regulation of technologies associated with agriculture and the environment. Prerequisites: AMC 315 and junior standing.

AMC 426 - Agri Power & Energy Management
Hours: 3
A study of the principles and theories needed to comprehend and manage agricultural and environmental technology associated with machinery/equipment and energy systems. Reduction and synthesis of natural and applied science principles which involve mechanical, electrical, chemical power systems; the adjustments, fabrication, maintenance, repair and man agreement of machines and equipment utilized in said systems; knowledge of entrepreneurship, client relations, communications, economics, safety, service, planning, and regulation of technologies associated with agriculture and the environment. Prerequisites: AMC 315 and junior standing.

AMC 428 - Laboratory Management in Agricultural Mechanization
Hours: 3
Principles and techniques for planning, organizing, and supervising instructional activities in agricultural mechanization. Topics include lab safety, inventory control, equipment selection, skill development, and assessment methods.

AMC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

AMC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 205 - Livestock Selection & Evaluation
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2321) Selection and evaluation of breeding and market animals, breed characteristics, and carcass evaluation as it relates to live animal evaluation. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or concurrent enrollment.

ANS 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

ANS 307 - Animal Feeds and Feeding
Hours: 3
Chemical composition of feedstuffs, requirements of domestic animals, utilization of nutrients, formulating and balancing rations. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, CHEM 1405 or 1411, MATH 1314.

ANS 308 - Animal Nutrition
Hours: 3
Functions of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, lipids, minerals and water. Chemistry and physiology of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of nutrients and their metabolites in animals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, CHEM 1405 or 1411, and MATH 1314.

ANS 310 - Genetics of Livestock Improvement
Hours: 3
Introduction to genetic principles involved in domestic animal improvement. Methods available to the animal breeder and their effectiveness. Gene action, crossbreeding, inbreeding and other mating plans. Prerequisites: (ANS 1319 or BSC 1407 or PLS 1315 or PLS 1307) and CHEM 1411.

ANS 311 - Reproductive Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Comparative anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems of domestic animals, endocrinology of reproduction, gestation and parturition. Prerequisites: ANS 1319, BSC 1407, CHEM 1411.

ANS 312 - Artificial Breeding of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Principles of artificial breeding of farm animals. Semen collection and evaluation, gamete freezing and storage, reproduction management techniques and pregnancy diagnosis. Prerequisites: ANS 311.

ANS 313 - Dairying
Hours: 3
Dairy breeds and their selection, milk secretion, composition and handling, milking equipment and facilities. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 314 - Comparative Vertebrate Physiology
Hours: 3
The course is a comparative study of basic physiological principles and functional organization with emphasis on the functioning of organ systems in various vertebrate classes and their adaptation to the environment leading to an understanding of evolutionary relationships. The course evaluates i) the mechanisms by which animals perform their life-sustaining functions, ii) the ways in which diverse phylogenetic groups of animals both resemble each other and differ, iii) the ways in which physiology and ecology interact, and iv) the importance of all levels of organization, from genes to proteins and tissues to organs, for the full understanding of physiological systems. Cross listed with BSC 314

ANS 317 - Livestock Management Techniques
Hours: 3
Application of animal handling and management techniques for dairy, beef, sheep, swine and poultry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319.

ANS 319 - Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
Hours: 3
Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. Three semester hours. Structure and function of organ systems with special reference to domestic animals. Prerequisites: Chem 1405 or 1411.

ANS 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topic

ANS 409 - Ultrasound Techniques
Hours: 3
Ultrasound Techniques for Body Composition in Livestock - Three semester hours Basic knowledge and techniques of real-time ultrasound to measure body composition in livestock. Cross list with: ANS 510

ANS 411 - Sheep and Goat Management
Hours: 3
Types, breeds and usefulness of sheep and goats in the U.S. Management systems, production schemes, and general husbandry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and junior standing.

ANS 412 - Beef Cattle Management
Hours: 3
Concepts and principles of breeding, feeding and management of beef cattle in the U.S. A survey of the past, present and future ideas of the beef cattle industry. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and junior standing.

ANS 413 - Swine Management
Hours: 3
Commercial and purebred swine operations. Feeding, breeding, and management practices, production efficiency and waste management facilities. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and junior standing.

ANS 415 - Companion Animal Management
Hours: 3
Anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health of companion animals including cats, dogs, rabbits, rats, mice, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Problem solving and enterprise management. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 and junior standing.

ANS 416 - Animals and Society
Hours: 3
Animals and Society. Three semester hours. (Capstone) This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of how animals (companion animals, livestock, wild animals) impact and effect our daily lives, our society, and our economy and their impacts on national security. Topic areas include: Introduction; Animals in History; Animals in Other Societies; Animal-Human Relationships; Animals in Prison Industries; Animal Rights/Animal Welfare; and Management and various unique aspects of species of Companion Animals, including dogs, cats, and horses; and birds reptiles and other pets.

ANS 419 - Diseases and Parasites of Livestock
Hours: 3
Diseases and Parasites of Livestock. Three semester hours. A study of the control and prevention of common infectious and non-infectious diseases of livestock. The common parasites, their prevention, and control. Prerequisites: AnS 118, BSC 1407, BSC 1413 and 254.

ANS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

ANS 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Honors Thesis - Three semester hours

ANS 491 - H Honor Reading
Hours: 3
Honors Readings in Animal Science. Three semester hours.

ANS 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

ANS 1119 - Introduction to Animal Science Laboratory
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1119) Laboratory in the preliminary study of the selection, reproduction, nutrition and marketing of beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep, horses and poultry.

ANS 1319 - Introduction to Animal Science
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1319) Preliminary study of the selection, reproduction, nutrition and marketing of beef and dairy cattle, swine, sheep, horses and poultry.

EQSC 140 - Introduction to Horsemanship and Equitation
Hours: 3
Introduction to horse handling and equitation including grooming, saddling, bridling, horse care and basic riding techniques (English and Western). Emphasis on practical work and confidence building for students with little or no horse experience.

EQSC 225 - Horse Evaluation
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2321) Introduction to horse judging. Establishes the critical and analytical thinking skills, judgment, and written and oral communication skills in preparation for horse judging in competitive settings.

EQSC 240 - Introduction to Equine Science
Hours: 3
Introduction to structure and function of the horse, equine management, nutrition, conformation, biomechanics, reproduction and health. Overview of the equine industry and career choices.

EQSC 241 - Advanced Horsemanship
Hours: 3
Refinement of equitation and horse training principles for various disciplines. Prerequisites: EQSC 240, EQSC 345.

EQSC 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

EQSC 321 - Equine Genetics and Mating Selection
Hours: 3
Principles of genetics, and application of breeding selection with emphasis on the horse. Study of genetic disorders, inheritance, and genetic improvement of horses. Prerequisites: ANS 118 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 322 - Equine Exercise Physiology
Hours: 3
Fundamentals of evidence-based equine training and exercise methods. Discussion of training programs, their assessment and effectiveness, and prevention of exercise-induced injuries. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240, and EQSC 323.

EQSC 323 - Equine Anatomy and Physiology
Hours: 3
Equine structure and function with emphasis on the nervous, respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems.

EQSC 325 - Advanced Horse Evaluation
Hours: 3
Course emphasis is on equine evaluation in competition with refinement of decision making and public speaking skills. Travel to horse competitions is required. Prerequisites: EQSC 225.

EQSC 340 - Yearling Training
Hours: 3
This class is designed to help students learn the objectives for training yearling colts. The students will do ground work with the horses that is beyond halter breaking the colts. The students will work on getting horses ready for the many aspects involved in being saddle horses. The students will learn how to teach the colts to walk, trot, and lope in both directions on a longe line, load into a trailer on their own, listen to verbal commands, come up to people in the pasture for catching, stand correctly and still for purposes of show, general obedience, and future farrier needs, as well as many other aspects of training a young horse. Prerequisites: EQSC 240.

EQSC 341 - 2-Yr-Old Horse Training
Hours: 3
Habituation of the young horse to tack and work under saddle. Prerequisites: EQSC 240, EQSC 241, EQSC 345.

EQSC 342 - Equine Nutrition
Hours: 3
Nutrition of the horse according to stage of development, use and training. Discussion of ration formulation, feeding practice and digestive disorders. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 343 - Equine Reproduction
Hours: 3
Anatomy and physiology of the mare and stallion including lactation, endocrinology, parturition, semen quality and behavior. Management of broodmares, stallions and foals. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 344 - Equine Veterinary Techniques
Hours: 3
Equine disease management with focus on preventative health care. Introduction to first response emergency and critical care techniques and appropriate application of veterinary medications. Prerequisites: EQSC 240 or ANS 118.

EQSC 345 - Equine Training and Behavior Modification
Hours: 3
Introduction to equine perception, behavior, memory and learning. Behavior analysis in young and adult horses and application of evidence-based training principles. Introduction of corrective methods to discourage unwanted behaviors and enforce the desired behaviors. Prerequisites: EQSC 240 or ANS 118.

EQSC 346 - Equine Reproductive Techniques
Hours: 3
Introduction to routine reproductive techniques such as estrus detection, semen management, breeding techniques, artificial insemination, sonographic pregnancy diagnosis, and introduction to reproductive health management. Emphasis is on stallion, mare and foal examination and application of veterinary techniques related to equine reproduction. Prerequisites: ANS 1319 or EQSC 240, EQSC 343.

EQSC 441 - Stable Management
Hours: 3
Horse and barn management principles for breeding, training or boarding facilities including horse and client safety, preventative health care, record keeping, emergency care, facility and manure management, feed and supply management, equine law and customer relations. Prerequisites: EQSC 240.

EQSC 443 - Equine Enterprise Management
Hours: 3
Application of economic principles to the equine industry in order to develop a profitable equine business. Discussion of strategies to develop a business idea or a starter business, as well as adequate pricing and marketing of equine services. Prerequisites: ANS 118 or EQSC 240.

EQSC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4

EQSC 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member.

EQSC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topic

FDSC 210 - Principles of Food Science
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1329)Basic principles of food preservation in relation to processing techniques and quality control procedures. Processing effects on aesthetic and nutritional food quality of plant and animal products will be explored. Field trips to food processing companies will be required.

FDSC 318 - Meat Technology
Hours: 3
Meat Technology. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 3 lab). Theory and practice of slaughtering, processing, curing, and storing meat from domestic animals. Wholesale and retail cuts. Prerequisite: AnS 118 and FDSC 210.

FDSC 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 0-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

FDSC 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PLS 230 - Ornamental Plant Identification
Hours: 3
Ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, and garden annuals and perennials. Their identification, nomenclature, classification, cultural requirements and landscape uses.

PLS 253 - Economic Entomology
Hours: 3
(AGRI 2313) This course introduces students to the major orders of insects and other arthropods of economic importance with specific emphasis on those beneficial and harmful to agricultural and horticultural crops, livestock, pets, and food products. Control techniques using Integrated Pest Management will be included.

PLS 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

PLS 303 - Introduction to Floral Design
Hours: 3
Introduction to the history and uses of floral art in society. Principles and elements of design will be discussed and demonstrated using floral materials.

PLS 305 - Landscape Design
Hours: 3
Design of residential and commercial landscapes. The student will learn basic design concepts and themes, be able to create landscape plans, and will be able to provide a cost estimate for the design. Prerequisites: PLS 230 or instructor approval.

PLS 306 - Plant Propagation
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to sexual and asexual plant propagation. The student will learn the skills and techniques to successfully propagate plants from seeds and other vegetative structures. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or PLS 1307.

PLS 309 - Soil Science
Hours: 3
Origin, formation, fertility and management of soils. Prerequisites: PlS 115 or 1415, and Chem 1405 or 1411.

PLS 320 - Soil Fert-Plant Nutrition
Hours: 3
Soil Fertility and Plant Nutrition. Three semester hours. Elements required for plant nutrition and their effects on plant growth. Principles of uptake, transport and assimilation. Prerequisite: PLS 309.

PLS 321 - Soil Morphology Class/Map
Hours: 4
Soil Morphology Classification and Mapping. Four semester hours (3 lecture, 2 lab). A comprehensive study of the morphological features of the soil profile in relation to soil utilization and management. Emphasis will be given toward soil development, classification, and mapping.

PLS 323 - Field Crops
Hours: 3
Field Crops. Three semester hours (2 lecture, 2 lab). Principles of agronomic crop production practices. Major field crops and management techniques will be studied. Prerequisite: PlS 115

PLS 326 - Forage and Pasture Crops
Hours: 3
The production, harvesting, storage, and uses of forage crops, hay and pasture crops, improvements, care and management of pastures given special emphasis. Practice work includes identification of seeds and plants, judging of hay, and field and pasture observation. Prerequisites: PLS 115, PLS 309.

PLS 328 - Introduction to Range Management
Hours: 3
Principles of range management include plant identification, plant growth and nutrient cycling, range inventory (evaluation, condition, and improvement) and the effects of grazing.

PLS 329 - Soil Science Laboratory
Hours: 1
Atudents will explore laboratory techniques to determine soil physical and chemical properties that are related to plant growth. Prerequisites: PlS 115 or 1415, and Chem 1405 or 1411.

PLS 355 - Interior Plantscaping
Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction into interior plantscapes. The course will include identification, selection, installation, maintenance, and management of plants used in interior landscapes.

PLS 381 - Crop Physiology
Hours: 3
Physiological processes underlying crop management practices and their alternatives. Prerequisites: Chem 1407, PlS 115 or PLS 1415.

PLS 397 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-4

PLS 417 - Geospatial Mapping
Hours: 3
The course will provide basic knowledge of the fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), including GIS theory and applications. The course will take a hands-on and problem solving approach to learning GIS and will cover basic GIS including map characteristics and projections, spatial data models, relational databases, and spatial analysis with a focus on natural resource research and management and environmental science. Prerequisites: BSC 1407 or 1413.

PLS 420 - Crop Production Practicum
Hours: 3
Crop Production Practicum. Three semester hours (1 lecture, 4 lab). Study of crop production practices in this area by actually planting, growing, harvesting, and marketing a crop: (a) Wheat or Oats; (b) Corn; (c) Grain Sorghum; (d) Cotton. A report, including costs and returns, will be due upon completion of the project. Course may be repeated when subject varies, up to a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: PlS 115.

PLS 430 - Greenhouse Management
Hours: 3
This course covers greenhouse structures and equipment needed for successful plant production in a greenhouse. The student will learn about greenhouse construction, production, and management as a business venture. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or 1307.

PLS 434 - Weed Control
Hours: 3
An introduction to the principles of weeds, weed control, and herbicides.

PLS 450 - Landscape Management
Hours: 3
This course covers information related to the management of landscapes on residential and commercial properties. Topics will include items related to effective installation and maintenance of landscape properties, including financial and personnel aspects of managing a landscape business. Prerequisites: PLS 1315 or instructor approval.

PLS 455 - Turfgrass Management
Hours: 3
Establishment and maintenance of turfgrasses in lawns, sports fields, and golf courses. Course will include selection, planting, fertilization, maintenance, and pest and disease control.

PLS 460 - Plant Taxonomy
Hours: 3
A systematic overview of the plant kingdom focusing on classification and identification of unknown specimens.

PLS 485 - Plant Breeding
Hours: 3
Plant Breeding. Three semester hours. (2 lecture, 2 lab) An applied study of genetics, plant breeding techniques and varietal improvement of both agronomic and horticultural crops. Prerequisites: PlS 115 and 381.

PLS 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

PLS 490 - Independent Study
Hours: 3

PLS 491 - H Ind Honors Readings
Hours: 3

PLS 497 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PLS 1107 - Introduction to Plant Science Lab
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1107) Course will provide students with hands-on exercises in the lab, greenhouse, and field. Students will grow agronomic and vegetable crops, separate plants into their morphological components, prepare and view cross sections of leaves and stems, alter light sources, test different soil fertility treatments, administer water stress and measure plant water relations, emasculate blooms, alter environmental conditions to promote flowering, quantify yield components, and examine genetic variability.

PLS 1115 - Introduction to Horticulture Laboratory
Hours: 1
(AGRI 1115) Introduction to the techniques and science for the growth and propagation of horticultural plants, including identification, propagation, fertilization, and pruning.

PLS 1307 - Introduction to Plant Science
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1307) An introduction to the principles of plant growth, general crop production, and ornamental and production horticulture.

PLS 1315 - Introduction to Horticulture
Hours: 3
(AGRI 1315) Introduction to the science and art of modern horticultural plant production and growth, including propagation, fertilization, pest control, and pruning; major groups of garden crops including vegetables, fruits and nuts, ornamentals, houseplants, and florist crops. crops; lab includes propagation and culture of garden plants in field and greenhouse.

Rafael Bakhtavoryan
Assistant Professor
B.S., Armenian Agricultural Academy, M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Douglas Eborn
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Kansas State University

Gregory Eckerle
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., Kansas State University

Derald Harp
Professor
B.S., M.S., Tarleton State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Randy M Harp
Professor and Director School of Agriculture
B.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, M.S. New Mexico State University

Curtis Jones
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Douglas D. LaVergne
Assistant Professor
B.S., Southern University A&M College; M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., Texas A&M University

Jose A. Lopez
Associate Professor
B.B.A., Ave Maria College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Maggie Salem
Lecturer
B.S., M.S., Ed.D, Texas A & M University-Commerce

Nathan Wells
Instructor
B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., New Mexico State University

Robert L. Williams
Professor
M.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ph.D., Texas Tech University