Psychology, Counseling and Special Education

Tracy B. Henley (Interim Head)
Location: Binnion Hall Room 201, 903-886-5594
Psychology, Counseling and Special Education Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/educationHumanServices/departments/psychologyCounselingSpecialEducation/default.aspx

Psychology

The Department of Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education offers the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in psychology. This major prepares students for graduate study in psychology and for careers in psychology-related fields. A graduate with a major in psychology should possess the following competencies:

  1. understanding of basic psychological principles within the sub-disciplines of psychology,
  2. knowledge of research design and statistics and their application in the study of human behavior and
  3. promotion of the scientific method to solve problems and enhancement of critical thinking skills.

The department offers master's degrees and a doctorate degree in psychology.  For information about all graduate programs, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

Special Education

The Department of Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education offers an all-level generic special education certification program as a major area for the Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies (BSIS). Students pursuing teaching careers at the Elementary (EC-4), intermediate/middle school (4-8) and high school levels (8-12) may also select special education as a supplemental certification area. The certificate in special education provides the teacher with a knowledge of disabling conditions and their effects on learning, as well as adaptations, accommodations and modifications for providing instruction in the least restrictive setting. The generic special education program prepares graduates for careers as special education teachers or related service personnel.

A graduate with all-level Generic Special Education certification should possess the following competencies: knowledge of disabling conditions; knowledge of professional roles, strategies for promoting learning and development; and techniques to promote achievement in English language arts, reading and math. Academic advisement for programs in Special Education teacher education should be obtained from the Mentor Center located in Education North Room 205.

The department offers the following master’s degrees and majors: the Master of Education, Master of Science or Master of Arts degree with a major in generic special education; or special education with the educational diagnostician professional certification. For further information about graduate programs, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

Students seeking a bachelor’s degree with generic special education as either a supplemental area or an interdisciplinary studies major must complete:

  1. general requirements for a Bachelor of Arts or Science degree (refer to the bachelor’s degree requirements section of this catalog);
  2. Core Curriculum Requirements (refer to that section of this catalog);
  3. requirements for admission to and retention in the Teacher Education Program (refer to Center for Educator Certification and Academic Services section of this catalog); and
  4. professional development courses (refer to the Secondary Education section or interdisciplinary studies major of this catalog).

In addition, courses in the major must be completed as shown below.

Students interested in special education should seek early academic advisement for developing degree plans. Some courses in the undergraduate curriculum are offered on a schedule rather than every term.

Counseling

The Department of Psychology, Counseling, and Special Education offers an undergraduate minor in counseling. The minor offers the undergraduates an overview of the profession of counseling and can be used as part of a more comprehensive education as one prepares for graduate studies and training in counseling. The graduate should possess listening skills, as well as knowledge of standardized and non-standardized appraisal techniques, of group and individual counseling theory, and of career development theory.

The department offers the master’s degrees for those planning careers in school, community, mental health and student affairs counseling positions.  In Texas students intending to become school counselors must first have two years of teaching experience before becoming certified as a school counselor. Therefore, the undergraduate degree, whether or not it includes counseling as an undergraduate minor, must include courses that qualify the student to first become a teacher.

The department also offers the Ph.D. in counseling. For further information about graduate programs, refer to the Graduate Catalog.

COUN 301 - Orien to Counseling Prof
Hours: 3
Orientation to the Counseling Profession. Three semester hours. (1, 2) A study of general professional issues including ethics, history, credentialing, professional associations, and roles of counselors in various settings.

COUN 315 - Phil of Helping Relatnshp
Hours: 3
Philosophy of the Helping Relationship. Three semester hours. (1, 2) This course is designed to create an understanding of helping relationships. Basic communication skills (such as active listening, responding, and interviewing skills) for building helping relationships are developed.

COUN 316 - Parent & Family Dynamics
Hours: 3
Parent and Family Dynamics. Three semester hours. (2) Approaches to parenting; assessment and development of parenting skills; communication systems; study of children and families with various cultural patterns and lifestyles.

COUN 317 - Intro to Assessment
Hours: 3
Introduction to Assessment. Three semester hours. (1, 2) Emphasis will be given to the use of standardized and nonstandardized procedures to assess and appraise human behavior. Use of test and non-test data will also be covered. Emphasis will also be given to the use of appraisal and assessment methods in a variety of settings, including school, business, mental health, and human services.

COUN 397 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

COUN 409 - Group Leadership
Hours: 3
Group Leadership. Three semester hours. (1, 2) This course will focus on the literature on groups, group dynamics and leadership. The class will also offer personal experiences in individual growth through group participation.

COUN 410 - Intro Coun Theory/Methods
Hours: 3
Introduction to Counseling Theory and Methods. Three semester hours. (1, 2) This course provides a general overview of counseling theories, an introduction to counseling techniques, the conditions which facilitate an effective counseling relationship, and stages in the counseling process.

COUN 412 - Career Development
Hours: 3
Career Development. Three semester hours. (1, 2) A study of the impact of career services as an instrument of human development and mental health. Emphasis on history of career guidance, contemporary shifts on social values in and the meaning of work, changes in the occupational structure, and work and mental health in today's society.

COUN 414 - Home & Family Living
Hours: 3
Home and Family Living. Three semester hours. (1) Functional study of modern family with special attention to roles, marriage preparation and partner selection. Emphasis on marital adjustment and other essentials of successful home and family life. Examination of current, relative issues of human relations including family planning, sex education, divorce, communications, and marriages under special circumstances.

COUN 441 - Introduction to Student Services
Hours: 3
A foundational course for those desiring entry-level occupational placement in college student services. Students review both historical and contemporary perspectives on student services in higher education settings. Students are introduced to theories and models of student development and interventions to promote student development.

COUN 442 - Student Services 1: Residence Life/Student Activities
Hours: 3
This course introduces students to student development theories, to the overall campus and campus living-learning environments, and programming within those environments to promote student development. Prerequisites: COUN 301 COUN 410 COUN 441 Junior Standing.

COUN 481 - Drug and Alcohol Addiction: Awareness, Counseling, Prevention, and Treatment
Hours: 3
Provides comprehensive coverage and the latest information on a full spectrum of substance use disorders and the compounds commonly abused. Topics include: the abuse of and addiction to alcohol; how the active agent in marijuana, THC, affects neural growth and development; the emerging body of evidence suggesting a relationship between marijuana abuse and psychotic disorders; the emerging body of evidence suggesting that marijuana is not as benign as it was thought to be even a few years ago; and updated information on the abuse of cough syrups, a trend that has evolved in adolescent substance abusers in the past decade.

COUN 482 - Anger Management: Skills and Techniques
Hours: 3
Anger is an emotion that creates a negative and unsafe environment which leads to unhealthy relationships. This course is designed to inform students the role brain chemistry plays in anger development and how brain chemistry, violence, and outbursts are connected. Students will gain insight into treatment modalities, anger management philosophies, and effective principles to aid those with anger issues.

COUN 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to four semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

COUN 490 - H Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member

COUN 491 - H Honors Readings
Hours: 3

COUN 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. (1, 2, 3, 4) Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PSY 202 - Understanding Statistics Concepts and Controversies
Hours: 3
An introductory applied statistics course that focuses on descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Emphasis will be placed on learning statistics through application and experience. Topics include visual displays of data, measures of central tendency and variability, standardized scores, normal distributions, probability, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression.

PSY 205 - Applied Professional Ethics
Hours: 3
This course follows the history of ethical thought from philosophers including Plato, Aristotle, Socrates and Kant in shaping current psychology and professional ethical thought in modern America. It examines the implications of ethical principals in professional applications. Existentialism, Rogerian principals and modern law will be examined. Comparisons of professional codes of ethics and their applications in modern society will be studied.

PSY 210 - Sport Psychology
Hours: 3
An overview of the principles of psychology as applied to sport or recreational activity for enhanced interactions and performance.

PSY 211 - Diversity
Hours: 3
This course will examine diversity in psychological functioning and the relationship between diversity and the self. This course will include, but is not limited to, topics relating to culture, intergroup relations, and the influence of one’s own and others’ cultural diversity for understanding others, one’s self, and the world.

PSY 214 - Aspects of Psychology
Hours: 1
This course examines professional and research opportunities in psychology and allied fields.

PSY 297 - Special Topics
Hours: 0-4

PSY 300 - Learning Processes and Development
Hours: 3
A course designed to provide the student with information about the application of psychological theory to the learning processes and development of children and adolescents. Principles and procedures of measurement and evaluation are also included. The primary objective is to facilitate a clear understanding of the complex, dynamic processes of learning and development. This course is required as part of the teacher preparation program.

PSY 302 - Psychological Statistics: Descriptive and Inferential
Hours: 4
The logic and methods of descriptive and inferential statistics and their relation to experimental design in psychology are studied. In addition to the three hours per week of classroom instruction, the student attends a one hour laboratory per week to apply the knowledge learned in the classroom. Prerequisites: (PSY 202 Min Grade C) or (Departmental Psychological Statistics Competency Exam Passed).

PSY 305 - Experimental Psychology
Hours: 4
This course is designed to familiarize the student with typical methods and techniques employed in psychology research. In addition to the three hours per week of classroom instruction, the student attends a one hour laboratory per week to perform experiments in psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 302 or PSY 406 completed with a grade of C or above.

PSY 310 - GLB/US-Psychology and Sociology of Diverse Populations
Hours: 3
(Equivalent to PSY 311) This course will examine the variables which affect the educational perceptions, beliefs, and behaviors of the microcultures which comprise our population. This course will include, but will not be limited to, school culture as a function of socioeconomic status, religion, gender, language, age, exceptionality, geographical origins and ethnicity.

PSY 311 - US-Psy/Soc Div Cultures FB
Hours: 3
Psychology and Sociology of Diverse Cultures. Three semester hours. (Equivalent to PSY 310) (Capstone) This field-based course examines the perceptions, beliefs, and behaviors of diverse cultures and their affect on our population. Culture will be examined as a function of socioeconomic status, religion, gender, language, age, exceptionality, geographical origins and ethnicity. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and Field-Based Program.

PSY 315 - Physiological Psychology
Hours: 3
Provides a basis for understanding the way in which biological mechanisms participate in behavior. It emphasizes both peripheral and central mechanisms involved in responding, sensing, motivation, emotion, arousal/sleep, and learning. Prerequisites: PSY 2301 or PSY 131.

PSY 316 - Abnormal Psychology
Hours: 3
Emphasis is placed first on a study of the fundamental principles of understanding and appreciating mental disorder. Then a study of the types of disorders including incidence, causes, symptoms, therapy, and prognosis is made.

PSY 317 - Psychology of Personality
Hours: 3
The various approaches to the study of personality and a consideration of its determinants, development, and assessment form the framework of the course.

PSY 319 - Child and Adolescent Development
Hours: 3
This course provides an understanding of how children grow and develop, the stages in the process, and the factors which influence growth and development.

PSY 321 - Psychology of Adolescence
Hours: 3
The course considers the patterns of "teenage" growth and development and the factors which influence them.

PSY 322 - Lifespan Development
Hours: 3
The course follows the lifespan development of the individual, emphasizing the theoretical and experimental approaches to the study of cognitive, personality, social, perceptual, and physical components of development from conception to death.

PSY 325 - Evolutionary Psychology
Hours: 3
This is a relatively new branch of psychology that has arisen from the confluence of psychology and evolutionary biology. This course will address how human minds and behavior have been shaped by natural and sexual selection originally identified by Charles Darwin.

PSY 327 - Cognitive Social Psych
Hours: 3
This class is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of social psychology with an emphasis on the cognitive aspects of interpersonal influence. Topics that will be covered include: social cognition, heuristics, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, cognitive dissonance and self-justification, implicit personality theory, attribution, self-serving biases, obedience to authority, and eyewitness testimony.

PSY 338 - International Psychology
Hours: 3
This course explores theoretical and practical issues of international psychology. These issues will be considered as they relate to human behavior. American psychologists generally concentrated on developments in American psychology. This occurs even though many innovations are international. This course is a discussion of the state of psychology outside of North America.

PSY 339 - Forensic Psychology
Hours: 3
This course focuses upon the application and practice of psychology in both the civil and criminal justice systems with the following topics examined in depth: police and investigative psychology, family forensic psychology, psychology of crime and delinquency, victimology and victim services, legal psychology, expert witness testimony, consulting psychology, and correctional psychology.

PSY 341 - Learning Theories and Processes
Hours: 3
This course provides an overview of theories of learning and factors that influence learning processes. Course content will cover traditional learning theories, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and instinctive learning. Although most of the research findings regarding learning principles will come from animal studies, the relevance of these findings to understanding human behavior will be discussed. The course will also address variables that impact learning and subsequent behavior. Such variables include stimulus control of behavior, cognitive control, and memory processes. The later part of the course will focus more on human aspects of learning. Prerequisites: PSY 2301 or PSY 131.

PSY 350 - Cognitive Psychology
Hours: 3
Examines human cognitive processes, including perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, reasoning, and developmental trends; experimental methods and data, and contemporary theories of cognition. Prerequisites: PSY 2301 or PSY 131.

PSY 389 - Independent Study:
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites Consent of department head. May be repeated when the topic varies.

PSY 397 - SPECIAL TOPIC
Hours: 1-4
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PSY 403 - Development of Modern Psy
Hours: 3
An introduction to the major schools and systems of psychology as they have evolved and as they exist today.

PSY 404 - Organizational Psychology
Hours: 3
This course applies behavioral science knowledge to professional organizations. The goal of this course is to understand how businesses can be designed so that both efficiency and the quality of employee life is improved. Topics will include employee selection, psychological testing, training and development, motivation, work stress and health, organizational design and change, consumer psychology, and engineering psychology.

PSY 406 - Advanced Psychological Statistics
Hours: 3
This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of statistical analyses. Topics include analysis of variance for fixed, mixed, and random models, analysis of covariance, repeated measures, the general linear model, multiple linear regression, and nonparametric procedures. Prerequisites: A grade of ‘B’ or better in PSY 302 or equivalent, and permission of instructor.

PSY 407 - DIFFERENTIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Hours: 3

PSY 409 - Group Processes: The Psychology of Groups
Hours: 3
This class is designed to introduce the student to the basic aspects of group interaction. The fundamental principles of group membership, identity and interaction will be identified. Topics that will be discussed include leadership,communication skills and patterns, conflict styles and resolutions, viewing diversity as a strength, needs for and uses of power, and team development and training. The student will develop these skills through active participation in numerous group activities and environments.

PSY 411 - Research Apprenticeship
Hours: 1
This course is an opportunity to gain experience conducting psychological research under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The course format follows an apprenticeship model. Students will work with faculty and/or graduate mentor on existing projects, and students will be trained by the advisors. Students will gain knowledge in research design and implementation by assisting in material preparation, testing participants, and coding data. Along with developing research skills, the research internship provides students with a unique opportunity to learn more about a specialized topic of psychology. Registration requires consent of supervising instructor.

PSY 412 - Research Apprenticeship
Hours: 2
This course is an opportunity to gain experience conducting psychological research under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The course format follows an apprenticeship model. Students will work with faculty and/or graduate mentor on existing projects, and students will be trained by the advisors. Students will gain knowledge in research design and implementation by assisting in material preparation, testing participants, and coding data. Along with developing research skills, the research internship provides students with a unique opportunity to learn more about a specialized topic of psychology. Registration requires consent of supervising instructor.

PSY 413 - Research Apprenticeship
Hours: 3
This course is an opportunity to gain experience conducting psychological research under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The course format follows an apprenticeship model. Students will work with faculty and/or graduate mentor on existing projects, and students will be trained by the advisors. Students will gain knowledge in research design and implementation by assisting in material preparation, testing participants, and coding data. Along with developing research skills, the research internship provides students with a unique opportunity to learn more about a specialized topic of psychology. Registration requires consent of supervising instructor.

PSY 414 - Intro to Hum-Comp Inter Design
Hours: 3
Students will learn the fundamental concepts of human-computer interaction and user-centered design thinking, through working in teams on an interaction design project, supported by lectures, reading, and discussions. They will learn to evaluate and design usable and appropriate software based on psychological, social, and technical analysis. They will become familiar with the variety of design and evaluation methods used in interaction design, and will get experience with these methods in their project. Pre-requisite: PSY 2301

PSY 443 - Psychology of Death & Dying
Hours: 3
This is the study of the processes of dying and the influence of the threat of death on human behavior.

PSY 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

PSY 490 - Honors Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of head.

PSY 491 - H Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Consent of head.

PSY 492 - Health Psychology
Hours: 3
This class is designed to introduce the basic concepts of health psychology. Students will be introduced to different medical disorders and diseases and the implications for the psychological health and impact on psychological functioning of individuals with these disorders. Students will study physical limitations and adaptations. They will understand basic ADA law and how to make buildings accessible. Psychological treatments for persons with disorders and physical limitations will be introduced. Topics covered will include depression and illness, traumatic injuries, neuromuscular diseases, cancer, and chronic pain. Also covered will be the use of psychological techniques to improve behaviors for wellness.

PSY 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 3

PSY 2301 - Introduction to Psychology
Hours: 3
The aim of this course is to provide a general understanding of the basic principles of psychology.

PSY 2306 - Psychology of Sexual Behavior
Hours: 4
A study of the physiological and psychological factors involved in normal and abnormal human sexual behavior with emphasis upon marital adjustment. In addition to the three hours per week of classroom instruction, the student attends a one hour laboratory per week to aid in the understanding of content learned in the classroom.

PSY 2315 - GLB/Psychology of Adjustment
Hours: 3
This course is a presentation of psychological principles which are fundamental to personal and social adjustment.

SPED 346 - Survey of Exceptionalities
Hours: 3
This course will provide a survey of populations identified with exceptionalities. Attention will be given to the causes and effects of these differences upon the individual's development. Emphasis will be given to the historical, legal, and philosophical aspects of Special Education services.

SPED 420 - Moderate and Severe Disabilities
Hours: 3
This course will develop skills for planning and organizing instruction for students with moderate and severe disabilities. Emphasis will be given to standards-based instruction in the core content areas of communication development, functional academics and life adjustment skills. Issues for medical management will also be discussed. Prerequisites: SPED 346 or permission of instructor.

SPED 449 - Assessment and Evaluation
Hours: 3
Students will be presented with a variety of assessment and evaluation procedures. Normative and criterion referenced procedures will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on curriculum-based assessment, progress monitoring, and the use of formative and summative evaluation strategies in educational decision making. Prerequisites: SPED 346.

SPED 463 - Effective Classroom Management and Positive Behavioral Interventions
Hours: 3
This course is designed to explore best practices of effective classroom management and individual behavior intervention strategies. Emphasis will be given to creating proactive learning environments through positive behavioral interventions and support. Discussions of Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans will be included.

SPED 464 - Transition Issues
Hours: 3
This course examines programs and services available for students, families, and adults planning for transition. Examined are variables influencing employment, community living and extended care in private and public agencies as well as sources of services, networks, and organizations for individuals with disabilities. Prerequisites: SPED 346 and SPED 420.

SPED 466 - EC-6/SPED Internship
Hours: 3
This course is taught in a seminar format during the EC-6/SPED field-based internship. Students will be involved in classroom observations and in supervised teaching of children with special needs. Activities include the application of developmental and learning theories in applied settings. Prerequisites: SPED 346, SPED 420, SPED 449, and SPED 463. Must have overall 2.75 GPA and a 2.75 in component areas of program.

SPED 470 - EC-6/SPED Residency
Hours: 3
This course is taught in a seminar format during the EC-6/SPED field-based residency. Students will plan, develop, implement and evaluate academic and social/behavioral programs for students with special needs in a field-based environment. Collaboration and transition planning are included. Prerequisites: SPED 466. Must have overall 2.75 GPA and a 2.75 in component areas of program.

SPED 472 - EC-12 SPED Residency
Hours: 6
This course is taught in a seminar format during EC-12 SPED field-based residency and includes observation, participation and direct teaching at the elementary and secondary levels for students seeking the all-level generic special education certification. Prerequisites: SPED 346, SPED 420, SPED 449, SPED 463, SPED 464, SPED 475, and SPED 478. Must have overall 2.75 GPA and a 2.75 in component areas of program.

SPED 475 - Collaboration, Accommodation, and Modification
Hours: 3
Collaboration models and accommodation and modification strategies are presented for content area instruction.

SPED 478 - Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities
Hours: 3
SPED 478 introduces students to research-based strategies and techniques for teaching reading and math to students with disabilities, or those who are at-risk academically, in a variety of general and special education settings. Attention will be given to universal design for learning. This course will also address teacher strategies for engagement and incorporating the use of technology. Prerequisites: SPED 346 and SPED 420.

SPED 480 - Issues for Inclusion
Hours: 3
This course is taught during EC-6 Generalist or 4-8 Content Residency seminar and is designed to explore academic and social/emotional needs of students with disabilities in field-based inclusive settings. Management strategies, academic accommodations/modifications, and social skill development will be addressed. Note: Limited to EC-6 Generalist or 4-8 Content majors only.

SPED 488 - Ind Prob in SP ED
Hours: 3

SPED 489 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-6
Independent studies are arranged as needed with individual faculty members.

SPED 490 - Honors Thesis
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

SPED 491 - Independent Honors Readings
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

SPED 497 - SPECIAL TOPICS
Hours: 1-4
Special Topics. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

Amir Abbassi
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Stephen Armstrong
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Linda Ball
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., East Texas State University.

Steven E. Ball
Associate Professor
B.A., Ph.D., Texas Technological University.

Curt Carlson
Associate Professor
B.A., University of Nebraska; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

Maria Carlson
Assistant Professor
BA., Marietta College, MS., University of Oklahoma, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

David Frank
Assistant Professor
B.A., Kent State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Stephen Freeman
Professor
B.S., M.Ed., West Texas State University; Ph.D., North Texas State University.

Raymond J. Green
Professor and Dean of Honors College
B.A., Drew University; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University.

Michelle Hanks
Clinical Instructor
B.S.I.S., M.Ed., Stephen F. Austin University

DeMarquis Hayes
Associate Professor
B.S., Northwestern University; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane University

LaVelle Hendricks
Assistant Professor
B.A., Northeast Louisiana University; M.Ed., University of Louisiana-Monroe; Ed.D., East Texas State University.

Tracy B. Henley
Professor
B.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

Brittany Hott
Assistant Professor
BA., Randolph-Macon College, M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University, Education Specialist, University of Virginia, Ph.D., George Mason University

Beth Jones
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Texas AM University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Lacy Krueger
Associate Professor
B.S., Texas AM University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia

Shulan Lu
Professor
B.S., Nanjiang Broadcasting University, China; M.A., Zhejiang University, China; Ph.D., The University of Memphis.

William G. Masten
Associate Professor
B.S., M.A., Michigan State University; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Mississippi State University.

Benton Pierce
Associate Professor
B.A., M.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Texas AM University.

Stephen Reysen
Associate Professor
B.A., University of California Santa Cruz; M.A., California State University; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Chester Robinson
Associate Professor
B.A., Bluefield College; M.S., Radford University; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University North Carolina.

Erika Schmit
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Louisiana Lafayette; M.S. University of Louisiana at Monroe; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Jennifer L. Schroeder
Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Chris Simpson
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Kevin Snow
Assistant Professor
B.A., M.S., Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D. Old Dominion University

Rebecca Stephens
Clinical Instructor
B.A., Tufts University; M.S., East Texas State University.

Karin Tochkov
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., University of Heidelberg; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany.