Psychology, Counseling and Special Education

Tracy B. Henley (Interim Department Head)
Location: Binnion Hall 201, 903-886-5200
Psychology, Counseling and Special Education Web Site: http://www.tamuc.edu/academics/colleges/educationHumanServices/departments/psychologyCounselingSpecialEducation/default.aspx

Tracy Henley, Interim Department Head
Curt Carlson, Educational Psychology Doctoral Program Coordinator
Chris Simpson, Counseling Doctoral Program Coordinator
Steve Ball, Applied Psychology Program Coordinator
DeMarquis Hayes, Interim School Psychology Program Coordinator
Chester Robinson, Counseling Master's Program Coordinator
Beth Jones, Special Education Program Coordinator

The Department of Psychology, Counseling and Special Education offers degree programs leading to masters, specialist, and doctoral degrees. In addition, courses in Psychology, Counseling and Special Education are also provided for students desiring licensure in school psychology, licensure as a psychological associate, certification as a professional school counselor, and professional certification as an educational diagnostician.   Provisional teaching certification endorsement is offered in the area of generic special education and support courses are provided for students desiring teacher, counselor, supervisor and administrator certifications. All students and faculty are expected to act in accordance with the ethical standards for the profession of psychology and will be expected to exhibit:

  1. an attitude that respects the worth, uniqueness, and potential for growth and development of all individuals;
  2. personal stability, ethical behavior, and respect for the confidentiality of privileged information;
  3. a personal manner in which responsibilities are fulfilled in a cooperative and conscientious fashion;
  4. productive and cooperative work relationships that display motivation, independence, and adaptability; and
  5. a commitment to continuing personal and professional growth characterized both by participation in professional organizations and by production and presentation of scholarly papers and publications.

The department reserves the right to suspend or remove from the program any student who, in the judgment of a duly constituted departmental committee, does not meet these ethical and professional standards.

Programs of Graduate Work

Master of Science in Psychology

The Department of Psychology, Counseling and Special Education offers the Master of Science degree in Psychology. This program prepares students for careers in mental health settings; psychology and training in business, government, and education; or further graduate work.

The 36-hour MS program focuses on courses in human cognition and research methodology, i.e. educational and experimental psychology. Most of the coursework completed for the master’s degree may be transferred to the PhD program.  The thesis option for the MS is available and encouraged, but not required.

Psychological Associate Licensure

Licensure as a psychological associate by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists requires a minimum of 27 semester hours of appropriate psychology courses, 9 semester hours of practicum and a total of 54 semester hours of graduate work in the degree program. Contact the applied psychology advisor for further information. The applied master’s program is accredited by the Masters in Psychology Accreditation Council (MPAC).

Specialist in School Psychology

The School Psychology program at Texas A&M University-Commerce prepares students for attainment of a Specialist in School Psychology (SSP) degree.  The current specialist degree program is consistent with requirements published by the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologist for the Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) and has been granted national approval from the National Association of School Psychologist (NASP).  Upon completion of the 66 hour degree program, graduates are eligible for licensure in the state of Texas as a LSSP and certification at the national level as a NCSP.  The 66 hour degree program includes 6 hours of practicum and 6 hours of internship.  The remaining 54 academic course hours are in the content areas of psychological foundations, research and statistics, educational foundations, assessment, intervention, and professional and legal issues. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Psychology

The Department of Psychology, Counseling and Special Education offers a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Educational Psychology. This program has an interdisciplinary perspective, with a strong foundation in methodology. Students will acquire an in-depth knowledge of human learning and cognition, instructional strategies, research, and evaluation. This emphasis will prepare students to integrate knowledge of human cognition and instructional practice across a variety of occupational, educational, and content matter domains, with emphasis on applications of learning technologies.

Career opportunities for psychologists exist with federal and state educational agencies, national and state legislative groups, regional educational laboratories and research centers, higher education, public and private schools, professional organizations, high technology companies, military, publishers, private funding agencies, medical organizations, and private consulting. Increasing opportunities for psychologists are expected in all settings where job training and retraining is required and where technology-assisted learning (including distance education) is employed.

Currently, the Department of Psychology, Counseling and Special Education offers a limited number of courses online, although the PhD program is not available as distance education. Still, the combination of online and summer courses available may make the doctoral program a viable option for nontraditional students.

Time to complete the degree program depends upon many factors, including:

  1. how many courses a student completes per semester,
  2. whether courses are offered during the semester that they are needed by the student,
  3. successful completion of comprehensive exams, and
  4. how persistent a student is in completing the thesis and dissertation requirements.

Some full-time students have completed the degree program within four years, but, of course, part-time students require more time. Coursework used towards the doctoral degree cannot be older than 10 years at the time the degree is conferred.

Graduate Minors in Psychology

Minors in psychology are available for students in all other master’s and doctoral degree programs.

Master of Science in Counseling

The Master of Science in Counseling offers an emphasis in School Counseling (51 semester hours) for those students seeking certification as a professional school counselor and an emphasis in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (60 semester hours) for those students desiring licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC).  Both programs include a common core as well as courses specific to each emphasis.

Master of Education in Counseling

The Master of Education in Counseling is a 36 semester hour program designed for those students who plan to work in college and university student affairs, but prefer a counseling foundation in their preparation.  Graduates of the MEd program typically seek employment in student activities, career services, academic advising, greek affairs, recruiting and admissions, residence life, and other departments and offices within the student affairs division of community colleges and four-year colleges and universities. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling

The PhD in Counseling includes approximately 69-72 hours of coursework beyond the equivalent of a CACREP-accredited master’s degree. This total includes doctoral field experience, specified doctoral courses, cognate area, elective cluster, research tools, and dissertation.

Master of Science and Master of Education in Special Education

The Department of Psychology, Counseling and Special Education offers two graduate degrees in Special Education: the Master of Science in Special Education, and Master of Education in Special Education. Programs of graduate work may be planned according to the interests of the student (i.e. thesis vs. non-thesis; focus on instructional design and delivery or educational diagnostician certification) and to meet the degree requirements.

Graduate Minor in Special Education

Minors in special education on the master’s degree are available. A minor consists of a minimum of 12 hours in the area of special education and requires successful completion of the Special Education Comprehensive Exam. Minors in special education are also available for doctoral degree students majoring in supervision, curriculum and instruction, educational administration, counseling, psychology, and related areas.

Admission

Psychology - MS

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department.  Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in Psychology:

School Psychology - SSP

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in School Psychology:

Psychological Associate Licensure

For students pursuing licensure as a psychological associate, modifications to the master’s program requirements include that the bachelor’s degree either be in psychology or include a course in statistics.

Educational Psychology - PhD

Before being admitted to the doctoral program, the prospective student must first meet the general requirements for admission to the Graduate School.  Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in educational psychology:

The department reserves the right to deny entrance to an applicant who, in the judgment of a duly constituted departmental committee, appears unlikely to succeed professionally, or whose goals are inconsistent with the orientation of the degree program, regardless of any other qualifications.

Counseling - MS/MED

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department.  Those who apply to Texas A&M University-Commerce Graduate School for admission to one of the master’s degree programs in counseling must meet the general Graduate School admissions requirements as described elsewhere in this catalog as well as additional departmental requirements. Application materials collected by the Graduate School will be forwarded to the Department of Counseling for review, and applicants are required to have approval of the department before the Graduate School will grant admission to the master’s degree program in counseling. 

After full admission to Graduate School is granted, the department requires students to meet its admission to candidacy requirements for the master's degree.  School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling students must earn a grade of A or B in the four Level 1 classes: COUN 501, COUN 510, COUN 516, and COUN 528 and pass the Level 1 examination.  Student Affairs students must achieve a grade of A or B in COUN 501, COUN 510, COUN 606, and HIED 540.  School Counseling and Clinical Mental Health Counseling students may complete no more than 9 semester hours in Level 2 prior to meeting admission to candidacy requirements.  More information regarding admission to candidacy is available in the departmental office.

Counseling - PhD

Admission to a doctoral program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in counseling:

Special Education - MS/MED

Admission to a graduate program is granted by the Dean of Graduate Studies upon the recommendation of the department. Applicants must meet the following requirements for admission in addition to meeting the general university requirements in special education:

In addition, applicants may submit for departmental review additional materials or a portfolio to support their application, including items such as awards, certificates of merit, examples of innovative program/curriculum development, publications, and a resume. Students seeking admission will be required to have approval of the department’s graduate faculty.

Note: The Department reserves the right to suspend from the program any student who in the judgment of the departmental graduate committee, does not meet the professional expectations of the field.

COUN 501 - Intro to Coun Profession
Hours: 3
Introduction to the Counseling Profession. Three semester hours. Recommended as initial course in a student's program to serve as an introduction to the counseling profession. Roles of counselors and related professionals in various settings are presented. Professional goals and objectives, trends, professional associations, ethical and legal issues, history, credentials, and preparation standards for counselors are explored.

COUN 510 - Counsel Theory & Tech
Hours: 3
Counseling Theories and Techniques. Three semester hours. A study of the philosophical and theoretical bases of the helping process. Includes study of major counseling theories, basic helping skills, and applications to diverse populations. Also includes professional issues related specifically to the counseling process.

COUN 512 - Career Development
Hours: 3
Career Development. Three semester hours. Interrelationships among lifestyle, work place, and career planning are explored. Career development theories; occupational, educational, and personal/social information sources and delivery systems; and organization of career development programs are studied.

COUN 513 - Communication In Marriage
Hours: 3
Communication in Marriage. Three semester hours. Theories and techniques of verbal, and nonverbal communication in marriage relationship are studied.

COUN 514 - School Counseling and Development
Hours: 3
As the foundation course for those planning to enter school counseling, this course covers organization, planning, management, and evaluation of comprehensive school counseling programs. Appropriate roles and functions of school counselors at various school levels, coordination of professional services; and professional issues such as ethics and associations as they specifically relate to school counseling are included. Recommended for non-counselor educational professionals as well as counselors. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 examination or consent of instructor.

COUN 516 - Basic Counseling Skills
Hours: 3
Provides the foundation for all practicum and internship experiences. Students learn communication and interpersonal skills under faculty supervision. Demonstration of these skills is a prerequisite for enrollment in practicum (COUN 551). Students will examine their intrapersonal issues and interpersonal styles and will follow ACA Ethical Standards. Prerequisites: Application form returned to department several months before actual enrollment in this course (check department for availability and due dates), Minimum grade of B in COUN 501 COUN 510.

COUN 517 - Assessment in Counseling
Hours: 3
Assessment in Counseling. Three semester hours. Includes group and individual appraisal techniques to be used to support career, educational, and personal planning and development. Standardized and non-standardized data information gathering methods, validity, reliability, psychometric statistics, factors influencing appraisals, and use and interpretation of appraisal results with a variety of populations are explored.

COUN 520 - Advanced School Counseling
Hours: 3
This course is designed to support further understanding of how to implement a comprehensive developmental school counseling program. Furthermore, this course thoroughly examines specialized topics related to school counseling. Through the course, students are taught models that can be applied in real life situations. They are also encouraged to develop their own models for practical application. This course is a required course for all professional school counseling graduate students and students pursuing a career as a professional school counselors in a pre-K-12 school setting. This course is intended to support the development of students’ professional school counseling competencies (dispositions, knowledge, skills, and attitudes) as stipulated by the CACREP. Prerequisites: COUN 514 or consent of instructor.

COUN 522 - Counseling Diverse Populations
Hours: 3
Counseling Diverse Populations. Three semester hours. Emphasis on developing knowledge, skills and attitudes for more effective counseling with persons different from the counselor regarding characteristics such as culture, race, gender, sexual orientation, physical disability, and religious preference. Substantial attention is given to developing awareness of one's own values, attitudes and beliefs as they relate to counseling in a diverse society. Provides an understanding of how diverse values and mores, interaction patterns, social conditions, and trends related to diversity affect counseling.

COUN 528 - Intro Grp Dynamics & Procedure
Hours: 3
A study of group development, dynamics, and theories in relation to group counseling. Leadership styles, techniques and roles are explored, and ethical issues related to group interventions are discussed. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 Examination.

COUN 530 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Hours: 3
As the foundation course for those planning to be counselors in mental health settings, this course includes theoretical and applied information regarding mental health counseling services in the context of the larger social services system. A variety of delivery systems, staffing procedures, case management procedures, emergency services, treatment paradigms, and the need for consultation and collaboration among mental health professionals are discussed. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 Examination or consent of instructor.

COUN 534 - Counseling Children and Adolescents
Hours: 3
Prepares counselors to address the specific needs of children and adolescents, with emphasis on developmental needs, specific therapeutic interventions, and common emotional issues. Group and individual counseling techniques and treatment planning are included. Prerequisite: Pass Level 1 Examination.

COUN 539 - Introduction to Play Therapy
Hours: 3
Students will develop an effective philosophy of and approach to play therapy and an increased understanding of children and of children's world views. Through an experiential component, the student will learn to communicate with children at an affective level, to promote children's self-exploration and understanding, and to increase children's sensitivity to and acceptance of others. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 Examination.

COUN 545 - DEV ISSUES/STRATEG IN COUNSELI
Hours: 3
This course provides an overview of theory and research related to human growth and development over the lifespan. In addition to meeting the core curricula objectives required for accreditation, the course provides specific developmentally appropriate interventions supported by research that are designed to enhance the growth and development of clients who seek counseling services. Crosslisted with: PSY 545.

COUN 548 - Advanced Counseling Skills
Hours: 3
A laboratory-based, experiential course, Advanced Counseling Skills will merge the continued development of basic skills with theoretically based conceptualization skills and techniques. Students will examine their intrapersonal alignments with chosen theoretical orientations. Students will practice theoretically consistent conceptualization skills and techniques. Students will be expected to adhere to ACA Ethical Standards. Pre-requisites: Pass Level 1 Examination.

COUN 549 - Ethics in Prof Coun
Hours: 1
Ethics in Professional Counseling. One semester hours Examines ethical and legal issues in counseling and the behavioral sciences. Includes theories of moral philosophy and the development and application of professional codes.

COUN 551 - Practicum
Hours: 3
Provides for continued development and practice of skills learned in COUN 516. Students develop conceptual and professional skills related to their practice at a field site and practice various specified counseling and related activities during a minimum of 100 hours at an agency or educational setting. Prerequisites: Application form returned to department several months before actual enrollment in this course (check with department for availability and due dates), a grade of “B” or better in 548, and successful completion of Admission to Candidacy requirements (or the equivalent for those seeking school counselor certification only), and pass Level 2 Examination within the Department of Counseling. Graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis, with a grade of “S” required to progress to COUN 552. Note Satisfactory performance at the field placement and during on-campus class meetings must be demonstrated before students can proceed to internship (COUN 552).

COUN 552 - Internship
Hours: 3
Primary interest is on integration of process, conceptual, professional, and personal skills. Provides extensive supervised experience in a setting closely aligned with student’s chosen program. Prerequisites: Application form returned to department several months before actual enrollment in this course (check for availability and due dates); successful completion of COUN 551. Students must receive a grade of “S” in the first semester of 552 to progress to the second semester of 552, and an “S” in the final semester of 552 to graduate and/or be recommended for school counselor certification. Note Course is repeated for two, three-credit hour courses, each requiring approximately 20 weekly hours (300 total in each) of field experience, to meet master’s degree requirement of six hours of internship.

COUN 560 - Crisis Intervention
Hours: 3
An overview of crisis intervention. Major theoretical models of situational crises are described and operationalized across a variety of service delivery systems. Students will develop conceptual competency necessary for professionals engaged in crisis intervention. Special emphasis is given to contemporary research in suicidology, disaster psychology, and crisis management for schools. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 Examination or admission to Student Affairs program or consent of instructor.

COUN 564 - Family Crisis & Resources
Hours: 3
Family Crises and Resources. Three semester hours. Crises and special problems encountered in family living with individual and community resources pertinent to them.

COUN 580 - Cou Substan Abuser: Drugs
Hours: 3
Chemical Dependency in Perspective. Three semester hours. Covers a broad range of topics related to chemical dependency that school, community, student affairs, marriage/family, career, and other counselors should know. Topics include prevention, abused substances and their effects, symptoms of chemical dependency, an introduction to various chemical dependency treatment models, applications in a multicultural society, chemical dependency counseling with children and families, twelve-step and other support groups, employee assistance programs, relapse prevention, HIV/AIDS and other current issues.

COUN 581 - Assessment and Treatment of Chemical Dependency
Hours: 3
Provides in-depth information regarding the assessment and treatment of chemical dependency. Topics include coping skills; motivation for change; management of stress, anxiety, and anger; screening for chemical dependency in health care settings; various chemical dependency interventions; and planning specific treatments to match individual clients. Prerequisites:Pass Level 1 Examination or consent of instructor.

COUN 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-3
Independent Study. One to three semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

COUN 590 - Legal Issues Stu Affairs
Hours: 3
Legal Issues in College Student Affairs. Three semester hours. Provides information about the legal issues common to college student affairs administrators. Includes student-university relationship, risk management techniques, civil rights, contracts and federal regulations.

COUN 595 - Research Literature and Techniques
Hours: 3
Emphasizes research in the student's major field, basic statistics, literature review, proposal and report development, research implementation, needs assessment, program development, and ethical and legal considerations regarding research through the presentation of a formal research proposal and/or completion of presentation of a research report. Prerequisites:Pass Level 2 Examination or admission to Student Affairs program or consent of instructor.

COUN 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 1-3
Special Topics. One to three semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

COUN 606 - Stu Affairs Services Hi Ed
Hours: 3
Student Affairs Services in Higher Education. Three semester hours. As the foundation course for those planning to enter students affairs work in higher education, this course offers students opportunities to examine the historical and contemporary role and scope of college students personnel services. Provides students with in-depth understanding of major theories of students development and the application of these theories to student development practice.

COUN 607 - Contemp College Student
Hours: 3
The Contemporary College Student. Three semester hours. Examines various aspects of contemporary college student life and characteristics of present and future college students. Presented as a seminar to identify and examine salient issues facing college students including, but not limited to, sources of motivation, learning styles, development of values, relationship development, mental-health/psychosocial development and issues related to gender, health, and intercultural concerns.

COUN 610 - Adv Counsel Theories & Techniq
Hours: 3
Advanced Counseling Theories and Techniques. Three semester hours. In-depth study of various counseling approaches with opportunities for demonstration and evaluation of each student's counseling skills. Prerequisite: Doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

COUN 611 - Introduction to Marriage and Family Counseling/Therapy
Hours: 3
A survey of the historical development and principal conceptualizations of marital and family counseling/therapy. Goals include an initial examination and comparison of various theories currently employed in the field with an emphasis on interview techniques. Subject areas to be covered include the various schools of family counseling/therapy, along with current trends and issues in marriage and family counseling/therapy. Prerequisites: Pass Level 1 Examination or consent of instructor.

COUN 612 - Adv Sem M&F Coun/Therapy
Hours: 3
Advanced Seminar in Marriage and Family Counseling/Therapy. Three semester hours. A didactic and experiential seminar course in marital and family counseling/therapy for advanced students. Emphasis is on the development of the student's therapeutic expertise in structural and strategic family intervention techniques. Prerequisites: COUN 611 and doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

COUN 613 - Adv Statistical Technique
Hours: 3
Includes a review of introductory statistics, presentation of basic concepts of analyses of variance, advanced correlational methods, and multiple regression, as well as other advanced statistical methods. Focuses on use of the computer for data. Meets requirements for a Level III research tool course. Prerequisite: Level I and Level II research tools or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Crosslisted with: PSY 681.

COUN 614 - Counseling Strategies for Parent-Child Relationships
Hours: 3
A didactic and experiential course dealing with counseling techniques applied to the improvement of parent-child relationships. The course focuses on intervention skills of transgenerational family therapy, play therapy, and parenting education based on an understanding of the family life cycle and family structure. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or consent of instructor.

COUN 615 - Marital Counsel/Therapy
Hours: 3
Marital Counseling/Therapy. Three semester hours. A study of counseling theories applied to marital and other dyadic relationships. Emphasis will be placed on the assimilation, integration, and application of information pertaining to such topics as marital/divorce developmental tasks theory, object relations theory, systemic family of origin theory, interaction patterns in marriage, divorce process, and post-divorce adjustment. Techniques and historical development of marriage enrichment, marital counseling/therapy, and divorce counseling/therapy interventions will be included. Prerequisites: COUN 611 and doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

COUN 620 - Superv Cou Human Develop
Hours: 3
Supervision in Counseling and Human Development. Three semester hours. A didactic and experiential course for post-graduate and doctoral students who wish to assume the role of supervisor. Goals include the assimilation and application of major theoretical/conceptual models and supervision approaches in counseling and human development. Prerequisite: Doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

COUN 621 - Psychoeducational Consulting and Program Evaluation
Hours: 3
Psychological, educational, and sociological theories, models, and processes applied to human and organizational systems of change. Special attention is directed to applying theory to practice and to differentiating between human and structural problems and interventions. Prerequisites:Doctoral standing or consent of instructor. Crosslisted with: PSY 679.

COUN 622 - Advanced Seminar in Counseling Diverse Populations
Hours: 3
This course provides students with a variety of opportunities to increase their level of personal (self-reflective) awareness, and clinical awareness, knowledge, and skills in working with diverse populations. This increased level of cultural competence better prepares students to teach supervise, and mentor counseling trainees and novice practitioner, to conduct culturally sensitive research, and to provide direct services to culturally diverse clients. Prerequisites: Doctoral standing or consent of instructor.

COUN 623 - Race, Class and Gender
Hours: 3
Race, Class, and Gender Issues in Counseling - Three semester hours The multicultural counseling competencies (Arredondo et al., 1996) specify that culturally skilled counselors are expected to understand how factors such as gender, social class, age, sexual orientation, religion, and educational background intersect and interrelate with ethnicity, race, and culture in the lives of their clients, as well as their own lives. The primary purpose of this course is to explore the interconnections of race, class, and gender; including how they shape the structure of U. S. society, and in turn, the experiences of client and counselor. A conceptual framework for understanding race, class, and gender, and their intersection provides students with increased understanding of contemporary issues that impact their clients’ lives, and provides a foundation for social justice consciousness that leads to client empowerment and advocacy. Pre-requisite: COUN 522: Counseling Diverse Populations or equivalent graduate level multicultural counseling course.

COUN 625 - Research Application
Hours: 3
A doctoral course which focuses on the development of research skills and inquiry methods. The student is exposed to various quantitative and qualitative approaches. In addition, the course provides students with an understanding of scientific inquiry, purpose and benefits of research, research-related ethical and legal issues, and sampling procedures. Prerequisites: Doctoral status and completion of 30 semester hours of doctoral level coursework or consent of instructor.

COUN 650 - Inst Th & Meth in Coun Ed
Hours: 3
This course is designed to develop/improve counselor educator skills including planning units or courses, delivering instruction, and assessing learner outcomes. The course also addresses ethical standards for counselor educators. Although the primary focus is on teaching counselors-in-preparation, students will acquire knowledge and develop skills that are applicable to other situations such as presenting at professional conferences and conducting staff development. Prerequisite: doctoral standing or consent of instructor. Crosslisted with: PSY 680.

COUN 660 - Doctoral Field Experience
Hours: 1-6
The doctoral field experience includes a minimum of twelve semester hours, during which time students are involved in various supervised experiences. The first three semester hours include 300 clock hours of supervised clinical work in the department based training facility where students provide direct counseling to individuals, families, couples, and groups, and refine advanced counseling skills. Six semester hours (600 clock hours) include 300 clock hours of clinical experience in an approved site, plus 300 clock hours of supervised teaching and clinical supervision. During this time students are expected to expand their counseling, teaching, and supervision skills. Prerequisites: COUN 610 and 620; consent of Doctoral Internship Coordinator.

COUN 689 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-3
Independent Study. One to three semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

COUN 690 - Qualitative Research
Hours: 3
Practicum in Qualitative Research Hours: Three. This practicum experience is designed to complement and build upon knowledge gained in HIED 696 or EDAD 698. Prerequisites: HIED 696 or EDAD 698 Note: The course is intended for advanced doctoral students who plan to do a qualitative study for their dissertations and/or seek in-depth practical experience in the use of qualitative research methods used in educational research (e.g., interview strategies, participant observation, and case studies).Students will engage in practice and skill development in analyzing and interpreting qualitative data, communicating results, and evaluating qualitative research. Each student will complete a qualitative research project and write a journal length article based on the research.

COUN 695 - Research Methodology
Hours: 3
Research Methodology. Three semester hours. An overview of research methodology including basic concepts employed in quantitative and qualitative research methods. Includes computer applications for research. Meets requirements for a Level I research tool course. Prerequisites: Doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

COUN 697 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
COUN 697 - Special Topics Hours: Three Organized class Prerequisites Doctoral status Note May be repeated when topics vary

COUN 717 - Ethics & Prof Development
Hours: 3
Ethics and Professional Development. Three semester hours. Examines ethical and professional development issues in counseling and the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Doctoral status.

COUN 718 - Dissertation
Hours: 3-9
Doctoral Dissertation. Three to nine semester hours. A candidate must present a dissertation acceptable to the student's advisory committee and the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research on a problem in the area of his specialization. To be acceptable, the dissertation must give evidence that the candidate has pursued a program of research, the results of which reveal superior academic competence and significant contribution to knowledge. Graded on a (S) satisfactory or (U) unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 500 - Psychology in Education
Hours: 3
Psychology in Education Contexts. Three semester hours. A course designed for teacher education students to provide a thorough understanding of the dynamic relationship between cognition, learning, and development for school-aged children and adolescents. Formative and summative assessment and evaluation procedures will also be presented. This course is required as a part of the initial certification program in teacher education.

PSY 502 - Theories of Personality
Hours: 3
Theories of Personality for Psychotherapy and for Psychological Counseling. Three semester hours. Three semester hours. This is a study of the historically influential personality theories as they relate to contemporary psychology

PSY 503 - Abnormal Psy/Devpmt Psychopath
Hours: 3
Abnormal Psychology and Developmental Psychopathology. Three semester hours. The course is oriented to the social-biological origins and dynamics of psychopathology in adults and children including developmental disorders.

PSY 505 - Intro to Educational Psycholog
Hours: 3
Introduction to Educational Psychology. Three semester hours. This class is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of educational psychology with an emphasis on the cognitive aspects of modern pedagogy. Topics that will be covered include a historical introduction to theory, research, and issues in educational psychology through both classic and contemporary readings in the areas of instructional psychology, motivation, measurement, learning, technology, and socialization.

PSY 506 - Professional School Psy
Hours: 3
Professional School Psychology. Three semester hours. This course deals with pertinent issues in school psychology, such as ethics, emergent technologies, history and foundations of school psychology, legal issues, professional issues and standards, alternative models for the delivery of school psychological services, as well as roles and functions of the school psychologist. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

PSY 507 - Pharmaco-therapy
Hours: 3
Pharmaco-therapy. Three semester hours This course provides an examination of psychoactive medications and their use in the treatment of mental and behavioral disorders. The efficacy and safety of medications will be discussed. The course presents basic principles of pharmaco-therapy that are the rationales behind the pharmacological treatment of psychological disorders. Applied components will relate to the aspects of the course material to mental health service delivery. The class also examines the historical psychopharmacological perspective, basic pharmacology underlying the use of medication, and recent research in the field. Prerequisite: Admission to a Psychology Graduate program.

PSY 508 - Theory/Technique Applied Psy
Hours: 3
Theory and Techniques of Applied Psychology. Three semester hours. An introduction to theoretical models and their applications which are useful across a range of practical human situations. These include educational contexts, individual and group consultation, and organizations. Both assessment and intervention models will be presented, with an emphasis on their relationship. Active practitioners will discuss and demonstrate selected intervention techniques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PSY 509 - History & Systems of Psychology
Hours: 3
A comparative and critical study is made of a number of viewpoints in psychology from early experimental psychology to the contemporary field and organismic theories.

PSY 511 - Cognitive Science
Hours: 3
Cognitive Science. Three semester hours. Cognitive Science concerns the nature of human cognition from an interdisciplinary perspective, including insights from philosophy, psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, anthropology, and neuroscience. Selected topics include mental representation, cognitive processing mechanisms, language, and computational modeling.

PSY 514 - Theories of Human Learnng
Hours: 3
Theories of Human Learning - Three semester hours This is a course that is taken primarily by doctoral students, not master's students, as part of their electives on their degree plan.

PSY 515 - Neuro/Bio Bases of Behavi
Hours: 3
Neuromechanisms/Biological Bases of Behavior. Three semester hours. Designed for psychology or counseling students, this course is concerned with biological bases of developmental neuropsychology, peripheral nervous systems, psychophysiology, behavioral pharmacology, and their relations to central nervous system arousal, motivational, emotional, and memory structures. Prerequisite: PSY 315 or consent of instructor.

PSY 517 - Intro to Hum-Comp Inter Design
Hours: 3
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design. Three semester hours. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of human-computer interaction and user-center design thinking, through working in teams on a interaction design project, supported by lectures, readings, and discussions. They will learn to evaluate and design usable and appropriate software based on psychological, social and technical analysis. They will become familiar with the variety of design and evaluation methods used in interaction design, and will get experience with these methods in their project. Graduate student team projects will involve more advanced HCI design issues. Topics will include usability and affordances, direct manipulation, systematic design methods, user conceptual models and interface metaphors, design languages and genres, human cognitive models, physical ergonomics, information and interactivity structures, and design tools and environments.

PSY 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis. Three semester hours. This conference course introduces the candidate for the Master of Arts or Master of Science Option I degree to the theories and techniques of educational and psychological research and leads to the completion and acceptance of the thesis. Course is repeated for at least two three-credit hour courses. Graded on a (S) satisfactory or (U) unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 520 - Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Clinical Practice
Hours: 3
Students will develop knowledge of various cognitive-behavioral models of common psychological disorders. Students will learn to develop a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral case conceptualization, which will inform treatment monitoring and planning. Additionally, students will review evidence and efficacy data available for implementation of various cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies for specific disorders. Students will have the opportunity to implement specific individual and group cognitive-behavioral interventions within the context of the course. Throughout, this course will emphasize the integration of clinical expertise, knowledge of patient preferences, and evidence-based strategies to facilitate development of evidence-based practice approach to psychotherapy.

PSY 527 - GLB/Social/Cltural Bases Behav
Hours: 3
This course is designed to cover principles and research related to social and cultural bases of behavior, motivation, attitude, value, leadership, propaganda, groups, morale, industrial conflict, roles, ethnic attitudes, and status.

PSY 535 - Applied Behavior Analysis
Hours: 3
PSY 535 provides a focus on the basic principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA). While wide application of ABA principles will be discussed, the application of ABA to the field of education is highlighted. The overarching goal of this course is to provide advanced training in proactive and scientific-based approaches to behavioral assessment, behavioral management, and behavioral aspects of education. In order to meet this overarching goal, students must be able to demonstrate mastery of the course objectives, or learner outcomes. Issues related to the importance of professional ethics as related to the use of behavior change programs and working with vulnerable populations will be reviewed at length. (Same as SPED 535)

PSY 536 - Hypnosis Applications
Hours: 3
Hypnosis Applications Hours: Three This course introduces the advanced student to hypnosis and trance as they may be used in counseling and psychotherapy, as well as in behavior therapy, habit management, and behavioral medicine. Traditional induction and trance management techniques, indirect hypnosis, and a number of related therapeutic techniques drawn from a variety of therapeutic models are taught and practiced. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

PSY 537 - Advanced Therapeutic Intervention
Hours: 3
A study of selected current specific techniques used in the practice of psychotherapy. Students will study a set of clinical procedures based on different theoretical models, including cognitive behavioral therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, solution-focused psychotherapy, and others. Emphasis will be on technique with evidence-based effectiveness and practical value in producing therapeutic movement, and students will practice the procedures in controlled clinical settings. They will also be encouraged to develop an articulated practice model of their own. Prerequisites: PSY 508 or consent of program advisor.

PSY 538 - Ethics in Clinical Practice
Hours: 3
The course will provide a review of the basics of ethical philosophy and the current code of ethics of the American Psychological Association, with emphasis on clinical practice. It will also provide a review of the statutory and common law bases for conducting an ethical practice while minimizing risk to clients and the professional integrity of the psychologist. Prerequisites: Admission to the applied psychology program.

PSY 539 - Forensic Psychology
Hours: 3
Forensic Psychology - Three semester hours This course introduces students to the field of forensic psychology, its history, and the relationship between law and psychology, the mental health system, mental illness and criminal conduct. An introduction to the legal system is also included. As an introduction the course will highlight the following topics: ethics in forensic psychology, violence and risk assessment evaluation, treatment of the juvenile and adult offender, mental health law, psychology of law enforcement, forensic psychology in correctional settings, forensic documentation and report writing.

PSY 545 - Developmental Psychology
Hours: 3
Study of the lifespan of humans. Emphasizes both experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of cognitive, personality, social, perceptual and physical development from conception to death. Crosslisted with: COUN 545.

PSY 572 - Psychological Assessment and Measurement
Hours: 3
This course is the first required course in the sequence of assessment courses and is planned to provide a framework for the development of assessment practices. Attention will be given to issues of measurement, identifying appropriate sources of diagnostic information, reliability, validity, identifying and selecting test instruments, conducting the assessment process in an ethical and considerate manner, and interpreting norm referenced and criterion-referenced test scores. In addition, this course will introduce students to the concept of Cross Battery Assessment which offers practitioners the means to make systematic, valid, and up-to-date interpretations of intelligence batteries and to augment them with other tests in a way that is consistent with the CHC theory. (Same as SPED 572)Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PSY 573 - Intellectual Assesmnt I
Hours: 3
Intellectual Assessment I. Three semester hours. (Same as SPED 573) The purpose of this course is to attain knowledge of cognitive functioning and develop skills in the cognitive assessment of children and adolescents. This course integrates the skills of administration, scoring, and interpretation of major cognitive assessment instruments (e.g., WJ-III COG, KABC-II, & WISC-IV) in the context of recent cognitive theories and research. The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) Theory of Cognitive Abilities will be the primary underlying framework for interpreting test data. Also, an emphasis will be placed on utilizing the Cross-Battery Assessment approach when utilizing the CHC theory of cognitive abilities. Issues of assessing culturally and linguistically diverse children and adolescents are integrated throughout the course in addition to specified lectures.

PSY 575 - Personality Assessment II
Hours: 3
Personality Assessment II. Three semester hours. The course will examine the socio-emotional, behavioral and cultural aspects of personality and informal assessments for children and adults as part of the diagnostic process. Psychometric and ethical considerations with the use of these techniques will be considered. Computerized testing and scoring of personality tests and techniques will also be covered. Prerequisites: Concurrent or prior enrollment in PSY 572 and 503.

PSY 576 - Psychological Assessment of Children & Adolescents
Hours: 3
This course will focus on assessment and diagnostic/eligibility considerations pertaining to children and adolescents (ages 3-21) exhibiting characteristics of various disabilities as defined by IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and the DSM-V. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to multiple assessment techniques frequently used in determining diagnostic/eligibility criteria. Such techniques include interviewing, behavior rating scales, behavior observations, and specific standardized instruments designed to aid in the identification of disabilities in children and adolescents. Additional topics addressed in this course include: working with mulit-disciplinary assessment teams, intervention strategies. Prerequisites: PSY 572 or SPED 572.

PSY 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to three semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

PSY 592 - Group Psychotherapy
Hours: 3
Group Psychotherapy - Three semester hours Techniques and ethical considerations in group therapy. Topics will include psychological theories as they apply to group therapy. Techniques in group therapy and ethical considerations of group therapists.

PSY 593 - Health Psychology
Hours: 3
Health Psychology - Three semester hours This class is designed to introduce the basic concepts of Health Psychology. Students will be introduced to different medical disorders and diseases and the implications for the psychological health and impact on psychological functioning of individuals with these disorders. Students will study physical limitations and adaptations. They will understand basic ADA law and how to make buildings accessible. Psychological treatments for persons with disorders and physical limitations will be introduced. Topics covered will include depression and illness, traumatic injuries, neuromuscular diseases, cancer, and chronic pain. Also covered will be the use of psychological techniques to improve behaviors for wellness including smoking cessation, proper nutrition, and exercise. Such methods of treatment will include biofeedback, relaxation and behavioral goal setting. Graduate students will understand the applicability of foundations of health psychology to older adults and the study of geriatrics. Cross list with: PSY 492 - Health Psychology

PSY 594 - Ethical Issues in Organization
Hours: 3
Ethical Issues in Organizations. Three semester hours. Ethical issues applied to individuals in an organizational setting. Included are theories of moral philosophy and the development and application of professional and business codes.

PSY 595 - Research Literature & Techniqu
Hours: 3
This course will provide a study of the research literature in the students' field of major interest and develop and understanding of research techniques used in this field. Crosslisted with COUN 595, SPED 595.

PSY 597 - Special Topics
Hours: 3
Special Topics. One to four semester hours. Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

PSY 598 - Psychology of Gerontology
Hours: 3
Psychology of Gerontology - Three semester hours This course will cover topics in gerontology including physical and mental changes in older adults, transitions such as retirement, mental health issues for the older adult, and health issues. The course will provide needed information to help the older adult adjust to changes in life. The course will focus on positive sides of aging which are often neglected.

PSY 601 - Perception
Hours: 3
Perception. Three semester hours. This course is a survey of classical and current theory and research on human perception. It includes the relations of sensation and perception, stimulus and receptor correlates, physiological bases for perception, and the study of the visual, auditory, cutaneous, and chemical senses.

PSY 605 - Single Subject Designs
Hours: 3
This is an introductory level course concentrating on single subject data designs, visual inspection and inference of data and statistical analysis for educational and behaviorally therapeutic interventions and data collection processes. (Same as SPED 605)

PSY 610 - Nonparametric Statistics
Hours: 3
Nonparametric Statistics. Three semester hours. This course, a Graduate School approved level IV research tool course, concentrates on the logic and application of distribution-free statistics with emphasis on psychological and educational data and research. Prerequisites: Level I-III research tool courses or equivalent or permission of instructor.

PSY 612 - Psy Ed Statistics
Hours: 3
This course, a Graduate School approved level II research tools course, is an introductory level course that concentrates on statistical methods applicable to educational and psychological research procedures and interpretations.

PSY 615 - Psychological Principles of Consultation & Supervision
Hours: 3
This course will examine the psychological principles and knowledge base underlying the major models and theories of individual, organizational consultation, and supervision. Scientific information derived from the study of learning, cognition, development, and personality theory will be examined in relation to the common consultative and supervision practices and models employed in business, government, and education. Instruction and practice in the supervision of psychological services conducted in appropriate laboratories and agencies is also provided.

PSY 618 - Group Dynamics
Hours: 3
Group Dynamics: Understanding and Working in Groups. Three semester hours. This course will provide both a theoretical background and practical knowledge for understanding and working in a group environment. Basic principles of group membership, identity, and interaction will be identified. The ultimate goal of the class is to make the student a more productive group member. To achieve this goal, some topics that will be discussed include leadership, communication skills and patterns, conflict styles and resolutions, viewing diversity as a strength, needs for and uses of power, and team development and training. The student will develop these skills through active participation in numerous group activities and environments.

PSY 620 - Intro to Human Cognition
Hours: 3
Introduction to Human Cognition - Three semester hours This course provides an overview of cognitive psychology. We will investigate topics of perception, attention, consciousness, memory, imagery, knowledge representation, language, problem solving, decision making, and other selected aspects. Emphasis also will be placed on the relationship between mental processes and the brain. In addition, students will learn to appreciate the scientific methods that are developed to investigate these topics.

PSY 621 - Advanced Cognition
Hours: 3
This seminar course will examine the disciplines of cognitive science and cognitive psychology, with primary attention to the three predominant metaphors and models of the mind: the mind as a computer, the mind as a neural network, and the mind as a brain. This course is repeatable for up to six semester hours.

PSY 622 - Research Design: Introduction to Theses and Dissertations
Hours: 3
In this course, students will learn the principles of developing a research idea that can ultimately be developed into an actual research proposal. Students will be expected to abstract research articles and based on these summaries, identify and operationalize a research question, prepare a potential method section, and prepare and submit a research proposal draft.

PSY 625 - Cognition & Instruction I
Hours: 3
Cognition and Instruction I. Three semester hours. This course will examine the psychological principles and scientific knowledge base underlying the major instructional theories. Content will include an evaluation of how current theories and knowledge of human cognition relate to the principles and practices of instructional design and development.

PSY 626 - Cognition/Instruction II
Hours: 3
Cognition and Instruction II. Three semester hours. This course will require students to apply knowledge and theory derived from cognitive psychology to the design and development of instructional systems and products. Students will be expected to integrate cognitive models and knowledge of human cognition within the process of developing and designing instructional systems and products. Prerequisite: PSY 625 or consent of instructor.

PSY 627 - SOCIAL COGNITION
Hours: 3
Social Cognition - Three semester hours This course will investigate the research on the cognitive mediators of interpersonal behavior. This course is predicated on the belief that our social interactions are determined by what we believe we know about ourselves, other people, and the situations in which we encounter them. Topics to be covered include: Attribution, person perception, stereotyping, attitudes, the self, and social memory.

PSY 630 - RORSCHACH AND PROJECTIVES
Hours: 3
Rorschach and Projectives Hours: Three Students learn to administer and interpret the Rorschach, using the Comprehensive System Projective procedures involving drawing, storytelling, sentence completion, etc., are also reviewed.

PSY 635 - School Based Interventions
Hours: 3
Founded on a decision-making and accountability model, this course provides training in the investigation of theoretical and applied issues relevant to the design, implementation, and evaluation of academic, behavioral, and social-emotional interventions for students in schools. Emphasis will be placed on the linking of assessment to intervention design for the purpose of identifying interventions that are functionally relevant and fit the context in which they are implemented. Students will review various empirically validated intervention procedures to address student needs at the school-wide, small group/classroom, and individual levels and determine the effectiveness and efficacy of those interventions. Prerequisites: PSY/SPED 535.

PSY 640 - Evolutionary Psychology
Hours: 3
This is a relatively new branch of psychology that has arisen from the confluence of psychology and evolutionary biology. This course will address how human minds and behavior have been shaped by evolution.

PSY 645 - Introduction to Learning Technology
Hours: 3
This course will present an overview of the trends in applying technology to learning, focus on how different educational theories lead to the design and developments of technology-based learning, and discuss the research process of a few successful learning technology examples.

PSY 661 - Org Change and Improvement
Hours: 3
Organizational Change and Improvement. Three semester hours. (Cross-listed with MGT 594) This course will examine the principles of organizational change and the scientific knowledge base underlying the major models and theories of organizational change and improvement. Particular attention will be given to models and practices of continuous organizational improvement and how such models relate to current knowledge and theory.

PSY 670 - Multivariate Analysis
Hours: 3
Multivariate Statistics. Three semester hours. This course, a Graduate School approved level IV research tools course, provides a conceptual introduction, as well as computational and computer competence, in modern multivariate procedures. Topics include multiple regression, discriminant function analysis, analysis of covariance, multiple analysis of variance, item analysis, cluster analysis, factor analysis, and canonical correlation. Applications to measurement and test construction are emphasized. Prerequisite: Level I-III research tools courses or equivalent or permission of instructor.

PSY 671 - Advanced Tests & Measurements
Hours: 3
This course is designed to: (1) introduce students to modern and classical test theories, the concepts and the techniques, including test construct, scaling, modern and classical reliability theories, validity, modern and classical item analysis techniques, equating and test score interpretation; (2) provide students with knowledge about how a psychological or educational test is developed; (3) provide students with knowledge about strengths and limitations of psychological and educational tests; (4) provide students opportunities to discuss technical issues in test development and to practice their knowledge through projects. Prerequisites: PSY 612.

PSY 672 - Cultural Iss & Diversity
Hours: 3
Multicultural Issues and Diversity in Assessment and Therapy This course is an examination of cultural and diversity issues present in educational and psychological assessment and therapeutic treatment. Students will develop sensitization to personal and societal attitudes and values, as well as an increase of their awareness of current models of multicultural assessment and therapy/intervention. Topical areas addressed in the course are: culture, ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status, worldview, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation. The course additionally identifies models for developing competency in assessing and providing therapeutic services to diverse clients.

PSY 674 - Spec Topics in Clin Psy
Hours: 3
Special Topics in Clinical Psychology - Three semester hours Course will enhance the clinical skills of students planning to work as practicing psychological associates and LSSPs and other clinical fields. Topic might include Crisis Intervention, Therapeutic Interventions for Older Adults, or Behavioral Health, for example. This course may be taken a total of 3 times for credit.

PSY 675 - Advanced Topics in Educational Psychology
Hours: 3
The topic for this course is determined by the instructor, but will typically involve some aspect of cognitive, social, physiological, or quantitative psychology. Can be repeated when topic varies.

PSY 679 - Program Evaluation
Hours: 3
This course will emphasize both the practical and theoretical issues involved in the planning, execution, and interpretation of program evaluations. Prerequisites: PSY 612 or 572 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Crosslisted with: COUN 621.

PSY 680 - Professional Development
Hours: 3-6
This course is designed to offer practical advice and direction to graduate students, particularly doctoral students. This advice will focus on teaching, research, writing, and/or generally preparing the student for a career in academic or non-academic positions. Cross listed with: COUN 650.

PSY 681 - Intermediate Statistics
Hours: 3
This course, a Level III research tools course, will emphasize the understanding of intermediate level statistical concepts and their application to the social sciences and education. Content will include one-way, factorial, and repeated measures analysis of variance, simple analysis of covariance, and advanced correlational methods, bivariate regression and an introduction to multiple regression, selected nonparametric methods, and introduction to multivariate analysis of variance. Students will be required to use computational software to assist in the analysis and interruption of data. Prerequisites: Level I and Level II research tools or equivalent or permission of instructor. Crosslisted with: COUN 613.

PSY 689 - Independent Study
Hours: 1-4
Independent Study. One to three semester hours. Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

PSY 691 - Clinical Practicum Psychology
Hours: 3
This course consists of supervised experience in psychological settings under the supervision of a licensed psychologist. Course is repeated for at least two three-credit hour courses, each requiring at least 150 weekly hours of clinical experience. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Repeatable

PSY 695 - Research Methodology
Hours: 3
Research Methodology. Three semester hours. (Same as Coun/EdAd/ElEd/HPE/ SHEd 695) An overview of research methodology including basic concepts employed in quantitative and qualitative research methods. Includes computer applications for research. Meets requirements for a Level I research tool course. Prerequisite: Doctoral status or consent of the instructor.

PSY 696 - Supplementary Practicum in Clinical Psychology
Hours: 1
This course consists of supervised experience in psychological settings under the supervision of a licensed psychologist, specifically designed for the student has completed 9 hours of 691, but who requires additional practicum time to complete direct hour requirements. Prerequisites: Completion of 9 semester hours of PSY 691.

PSY 697 - Special Topic
Hours: 1-9
PSY 697 - Special Topic

PSY 718 - Doctoral Dissertation
Hours: 3-12
Doctoral Dissertation. Twelve semester hours. Doctoral dissertations must be acceptable to the student's advisory committee and the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research on a problem in the area of his specialization. To be acceptable, the dissertation must give evidence that the candidate has pursued a program of research, the results of which reveal superior academic competency and significant contribution to knowledge. Graded on a (S) satisfactory or (U) unsatisfactory basis.

PSY 790 - Internship in School Psycholog
Hours: 3-6
Internship in School Psychology. Three semester hours. This course consists of supervised experience in psychological settings under the supervision of a Licensed Specialist in School Psychologist. Graded on a (S) satisfactory or (U) unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Course is repeated for at least two but no more than four, three-credit hour courses, each requiring approximately 20 weekly hours of field experience, to meet master's degree requirement for internship.

SPED 518 - Thesis
Hours: 3-6
Thesis. Six semester hours. This conference course introduces the candidate for the Master of Arts or Master of Science (Option I) degree to the theories and techniques of educational and psychological research and leads to the completion and acceptance of the thesis.

SPED 520 - Introduction to Exceptionalities
Hours: 3
The purpose of SPED 520 is to familiarize teachers with characteristics and learning differences of pupils with exceptionalities. It includes training in informal assessment and a survey of research-based instructional strategies. Emphasis will be given to state and federal legislation guiding eligibility determination, services provided, placement decision-making, and development of individualized education programs in the least restrictive environment.

SPED 524 - Characteristics of Students with Mild Disabilities
Hours: 3
SPED 524 examines the characteristics of students with mild disabilities. Emphasis is placed on etiology, ethics, contributing factors, conditions that affect learning, the challenges of identifying students with disabilities, and the need for academic, social, and emotional accommodations, assistive technology, and support.

SPED 526 - Characteristics of Students with Moderate to Severe Disabilities
Hours: 3
SPED 526 examines the characteristics of students with moderate to severe disabilities. Emphasis is placed on etiology, ethics, contributing factors, conditions that affect learning, the challenges of identifying students with disabilities, and the need for academic, social, and emotional accommodations, assistive technology, and support.

SPED 528 - Special Education Law
Hours: 3
SPED 528 provides students with a history of special education litigation and legislation. Specifically, students will gain a deep understanding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, the major legislation governing the provision of special education services. Students will be exposed to issues of diversity and become familiar with how such factors have shaped federal statutes and regulations concerning assessment and evaluation procedures, due process and mediation, discipline, individual education plans (IEPs), free appropriate education (FAPE), and least restrictive environment (LRE).

SPED 535 - Applied Behavior Analysis
Hours: 3
SPED 535 provides a focus on the basic principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA). While wide application of ABA principles will be discussed, the application of ABA to the field of education is highlighted. The overarching goal of this course is to provide advanced training in proactive and scientific-based approaches to behavioral assessment, behavioral management, and behavioral aspects of education. In order to meet this overarching goal, students must be able to demonstrate mastery of the course objectives, or learner outcomes. Issues related to the importance of professional ethics as related to the use of behavior change programs and working with vulnerable populations will be reviewed at length. (Same as PSY 535)

SPED 540 - Assessment and Interventions for Social Communication Impairments
Hours: 3
SPED 540 addresses the (a) process of verbal, non-verbal, and paralinguistic communication skills; (b) assessment of communication competence, including social skills; and (c) research-based intervention strategies and effective practices for promoting effective communication for learners with social communication impairments, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. Language development, communication and language-based assessments, social skills training, alternative/augmentative modes of communication, assistive technology devices, and the impact of contextual factors affecting communication competence will be discussed and investigated.

SPED 553 - Cognition, Learning, and Development
Hours: 3
SPED 553 is designed for professionals providing learning and transition services to students with special needs. Consideration is given to cognitive abilities and styles, information processing, memory, and development. Prerequisites: SPED 520.

SPED 563 - Secondary Instructional Methods To Support Students with Disabilities
Hours: 3
SPED 563 presents evidence-based strategies and interventions for students with disabilities. A focus on quality reading, mathematics, writing, and behavioral assessment, strategies, and interventions to support students with disabilities is provided.

SPED 572 - Principles of Assessment and Measurement
Hours: 3
(Same as PSY 572) SPED 572 is the first required course in the sequence of assessment courses and is planned to provide a framework for the development of assessment practices. Attention will be given to issues of measurement, identifying appropriate sources of diagnostic information, reliability, validity, identifying and selecting test instruments, conducting the assessment process in an ethical and considerate manner, interpreting norm references and criterion-referenced test scores. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

SPED 573 - Principles of Cognitive Assessment
Hours: 3
The purpose of SPED 573 is to introduce students to principles of cognitive assessment. This course integrates the skills of administration, scoring, and interpretation of major cognitive assessments in the context of recent cognitive theories and research. (Same as: PSY 573)

SPED 574 - Principles of Psycho-Educational Assessment
Hours: 3
SPED 574 explores a variety of methods to assess students’ academic and behavioral achievement. Test administration, scoring, and interpretation of evaluation results are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSY/SPED 572, SPED 520, SPED 528 and Psy/SPED 573.

SPED 580 - Current Topics in Special Education
Hours: 3
This course addresses current topics and issues in the special education field. The student will develop an understanding of the role of convergent research evidence in addressing current issues in special education practice and policy. Emphasis will be placed on the use of research to support practitioner decision-making.Prerequisites: SPED 520. Depending on program selected ONE or BOTH from 524 and 526.

SPED 583 - Elementary Instructional Methods To Support Students with Disabilities
Hours: 3
SPED 583 provides students with an understanding of effective reading, writing, and math instruction, with emphasis on the challenges faced by children (K-6) with a wide array of disabilities. Major approaches to informal assessment and remediation in reading and math will be reviewed, enabling students to develop diagnostic-prescriptive programs. In addition, this course will provide students with methods of remediation in handwriting, spelling, and conceptual writing. Prerequisites: SPED 524.

SPED 586 - Collaboration, Transition, and Diversity
Hours: 3
SPED 586 explores models of inclusion and transition practices to support students with disabilities. Models of consultation and collaboration are presented for effective inclusion and transition practices. Accommodation strategies for supporting the academic/behavioral and social/emotional needs of students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms will be presented. Culturally competent and responsive practices will be emphasized. Home/school/community collaboration to prepare exceptional students for post-secondary environments through transition programming is emphasized.

SPED 589 - Independent Study
Hours: 3
Individualized instruction/research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member. Note: May be repeated when the topic varies. Prerequisites: Consent of department head.

SPED 595 - Research Literature & Techniques
Hours: 3
SPED 595 introduces students to fundamental research concepts, methods, and practices to address problems in the students’ field of interest. Emphasis is placed on review and critique of the literature and the role of research in applied settings.

SPED 597 - Special Topic
Hours: 3
Organized class. May be repeated when topics vary.

SPED 605 - Single Subject Designs
Hours: 3
SPED 605 is an introductory level course concentrating on single subject data designs, visual inspection and inference of data and statistical analysis for educational and behaviorally therapeutic interventions and data collection processes. (Same as: PSY 605) Prerequisites: SpEd or PSY 535.

Psychology, Counseling and Special Education

Amir Abbassi
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Stephen Armstrong
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Linda Ball
Assistant Professor
B.S., M.S., Ed.D., East Texas State University.

Steven E. Ball
Associate Professor
B.A., Ph.D., Texas Technological University.

Samuel Bore
Assistant Professor
B.Ed., Kenyatta University; M.Ed., University of North Texas; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Commerce

Curt Carlson
Associate Professor
B.A., University of Nebraska; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

Maria Carlson
Assistant Professor
BA., Marietta College, MS., University of Oklahoma, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma

Kelly Carrero
Assistant Professor
B.A., University of Texas at Dallas; M.Ed., University of North Texas; Ph.D., University of North Texas

Hsun-Yu Chan
Assistant Professor
B.Ed., National Changhua University of Education; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Stephen Freeman
Professor
B.S., M.Ed., West Texas State University; Ph.D., North Texas State University.

Raymond J. Green
Professor and Dean of Honors College
B.A., Drew University; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University.

DeMarquis Hayes
Associate Professor
B.S., Northwestern University; M.S., Ph.D., Tulane University

LaVelle Hendricks
Assistant Professor
B.A., Northeast Louisiana University; M.Ed., University of Louisiana-Monroe; Ed.D., East Texas State University.

Tracy B. Henley
Professor
B.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

Brittany Hott
Assistant Professor
BA., Randolph-Macon College, M.Ed., Virginia Commonwealth University, Education Specialist, University of Virginia, Ph.D., George Mason University

Beth Jones
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Texas AM University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Lacy Krueger
Associate Professor
B.S., Texas AM University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia

Sean Lauderdale
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Texas at Dallas; M.A., Ph.D., Texas Tech University

Shulan Lu
Professor
B.S., Nanjiang Broadcasting University, China; M.A., Zhejiang University, China; Ph.D., The University of Memphis.

William G. Masten
Associate Professor
B.S., M.A., Michigan State University; M.S., Emporia State University; Ph.D., Mississippi State University.

Benton Pierce
Associate Professor
B.A., M.B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Texas AM University.

Stephen Reysen
Associate Professor
B.A., University of California Santa Cruz; M.A., California State University; Ph.D., University of Kansas.

Chester Robinson
Associate Professor
B.A., Bluefield College; M.S., Radford University; M.A., Appalachian State University; Ph.D., University North Carolina.

Carmen Salazar
Professor
B.A., College of Santa Fe; M.A., Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Erika Schmit
Assistant Professor
B.S., University of Louisiana Lafayette; M.S. University of Louisiana at Monroe; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

Jennifer L. Schroeder
Professor
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Chris Simpson
Associate Professor
B.S., M.Ed., Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Kevin Snow
Assistant Professor
B.A., M.S., Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D. Old Dominion University

Karin Tochkov
Associate Professor
B.A., M.A., University of Heidelberg; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany.